Tag Archives: west coast rap

Black Bane Puts Eminem, Tech N9ne, and Brotha Lynch On Notice In New Video

Black Bane Puts Eminem, Tech N9ne, and Brotha Lynch On Notice With New Video

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First Degree The D.E. takes on the Black Bane persona and looks to raise the thought, talent, and purpose in today’s rap music

By Fahrenheit Insight’s Jimmy Blog

   Just when America needs answers, The D.E. provides. In a quest to bolster hip hop consciousness, Sacramento rapper First Degree The D.E. calls out rap heavy weights Eminem, Tech N9ne, and Brotha Lynch in new video, “Black Bane”, which can be seen HERE.

   First Degree The D.E. is a world renowned entertainer/activist and pioneer of Sacramento rap, has performed over 100 shows across the USA, and  is responsible for 55 projects in all. In addition to his uplifting message in the recording booth, First Degree is an active participant in South Sacramento community. The label he owns, Fahrenheit Records, had sold over 80,000 units world-wide , consists of artists stretching the West Coast,  and enjoys a 20 years history of quality, thoughtful, diverse music. Fahrenheit Records operates an award winning, world-wide online radio station called Fahrenheit Radio, and owns and operates 14 websites, including FirstDegreeTheDE.com, Sacramentorap.com, Californiarap.com, and USrapnews.com.

    The Fahrenheit Insight caught up with First Degree during the “I Wear Black Cuz Its Just My Style” video shoot at the 49er’s stadium in Santa Clara, CA. It was a cloudy evening with thousands of raucous, optimistic fans tailgating in the Levi Stadium paring lot for Monday Night Football’s opening of the 2015 season. The D.E.  gave us insight into the history and purpose behind Black Bane, and what it means to be a street vigilante. Who is First Degree Black Bane?

First Degree black bane 3First Degree The D.E. defines conscious lyricism with Fahrenheit’s 55 project, Black Bane The Misunderstood Genius Part 1

   Over his 20 year rap history, First Degree has put on many masks to deliver his message. This includes RoboDE, Blackulem, Shlumpulicious, and Super Black to name a few. Being Fahrenheit Records’ 55th project, the first thing The Fahrenheit Insight wanted to know about Black Bane was what the difference between it all the past First Degree characters.

   “The more things change, the more they stay the same,” First Degree explains. “Like the other recent characters I’ve portrayed on albums, I was told by the universe to take on this persona. I don’t just sit around and decide, ‘I’m gunna do this, or I’m gunna say that.’ God an His universe instructs me to do so, and I oblige.” He then went on to lay out the purpose of Black Bane.

   First Degree The D.E. went all out to detail the characteristics of Black Bane. He explained tat unlike the other characters he’s portrayed, Black Bane sees the world as a grey area, meaning there’s no definitive good or bad, just perspective. “Black Bane is a street vigilante. Once he’s locked onto a goal that’s just, he affiliates with the good and the bad in order to fulfill that purpose. He’s purpose is just, his means are questionable to some.”

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Long time Brotha Lynch producer Phonk Beta goes all the way live with his production on First Degree Black Bane

   When asked about Black Bane’s purpose and goals, First Degree related Black Bane’s vision of a fair society in which opportunities flow equally across all social and economic levels, the people are informed and inspired, and doing his part to help shed the effects of Jim Crow and return the people to the regalness that is within them. “This is what he calls fighting for the people. Black Bane just takes aggressive means and plays the role only he can play, in order to get the job did,” First Degree The D.E. asserts. He concludes, “To deliver this message, I relied on the Great Phonk Beta and challenged him to remind the people what makes him great, and he succeeded with an unbelievable array of superior, live shlumpage.”

When we got in the lab we asked ourselves how we can make this one bigger and better. We achieved that goal with thought, soul, effort, talent, time, patience, and purpose.

The Fahrenheit Record was given a copy of the First Degree Black Bane singles in preparation of this article. They include “Black Bane”, “I Wear Black Cuz Its Just My Style”, and “Say Serra”.

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First Degree Black Bane through the eyes of Oji

Black Bane

The first single is the title track, Black Bane. It starts with First Degree and The Celebration (his kids), telling the story of Black Bane to a dark, aggressive, piano driven, Phonk Beta beat. The first line, “The cost to be boss, atroc-it-ties, that most can’t handle, that’s that’s why you boss, that’s why you bump my blamble, that and rap scandal” provides immediate insight into the mind of Black Bane. The chorus is a daunting 8 bars of dark singing, thunder, and whipping. Black Bane’s lyrics are hard, political, and thoughtful, “Not affected by ISIS, that’s way far, the man’s cookin books here, that’s on our radar.”

The First Degree Black Bane video is another genius animation from Fahrenheit’s Oji, filled with good guys, bad guys, and all in between. The ultra creative video details the many faces and duties of Black Bane and his allies. In addition, the video includes Eminem, Tech N9ne, and Brotha Lynch. When asked why they were included in the video, First Degree explains, “Oji and I saw this video as an opportunity to remind rap’s division leaders to have purpose in their music, before its too late. I’m in cahoots with Lynch as we speak, collaborating on Strange Music’s ‘Kevlar’ album, and that ‘Black Bane Part 2, The Underestimated Villan'”. The D.E. asserts, “its time for the Brotha Lynchs, the Phonk Betas, and the First Degrees to get back together in unison and continue this legacy we’ve created.” He finishes his thought by including that Brotha Lynch was on his way back from Kansas City laying vocals for Strange Music’s Strangulation 2 album, and would will be back at work the Sactown vet as soon as he gets back.

In this single, First Degree raps, “(I’m) banned from Strange Music Inc.” When asked to elaborate, The D.E. declined, citing that it wasn’t the time and a desire to move forward. Why did he put the line in the song, The Fahrenheit Insight wonders.

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NFL Network films part of the First Degree The D.E. “I Wear Black Cuz Its Just My Style” video shoot, 49er Stadium with Empire Row

I Wear Black Cuz Its Just My Style

The second single from the Black Bane album is a dedication to West Coast 90’s rap pioneers and the influence it had on world-wide American culture. ‘I Wear Black Cuz Its Just My Style’ is a 90’s style Beta beat with live pianos and live guitar played by L.A.’s Eric Otis. The sound is a nice, unique mix between old school west coast sampling, a live Curtis funk band, and the Straight Outta Cmopton movie. The song’s title and theme came from a 90’s rap group consisting of The D.E.’s good friend Big Ron and Live Wire from the L.A. area.

The “Wear Black’ video was being shot at 49ers Levi Stadium in Santa Clara, California the day of this interview. An official 49er’s tailgating pep rally, thrown by Arevalo Production’s Empire Row, served as the back drop. It was a nationally televised Monday Night Football game and the unveiling of the 49ers’ new black uniforms. It was a wild event, filled with Fahrenheit fans and 49er faithfuls alike. The scene is sure to jump off the camera as soon as the video is completed and released.

First Degree black bane 5First Degree utilizes green screen for the first time in Say Serra

Say Serra

The third Black Bane video is the most musical, lyrical, and entertaining of the bunch.” Say Serra” is a finely-crafted First Degree hit with its own sound and racially controversial lyrics that will have the streets buzzing for some time to come. This single has a hard, groovy, big production, live sound that has never and will never be duplicated. Once again, Phonk Beta is on the beat and live pianos, and Eric Otis is on the live Spanish guitar.

The Say Serra video is all D.E.. First Degree gets close up, entertains, dances, and delivers his unique brand of poetry, “That video’s gunna be up close and personal to leave no doubt what I’m sayin!” Oh boy.

When asked how one picks singles for the album, First Degree reiterates that he is a vessel of the universe and does what it instructs him to do. He also points out that local publication Sacramento News and Review leaked and reviewed one of the songs, ‘The Fahrenheit Record’, HERE. The article included reporter Raheem Hosseini’s funny individual experience with the informative song. The Fahrenheit Record mentions many Sacramento area reporters, and several of them, including the KCRA’s Edie Lambert, Kevin Riggs, and Sacramento Bee’s Chris Macias started the buzz by posting about the song on their Facebook pages.

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D’Angelo Black Messiah played a roll in developing First Degree Black Bane

   When asked about what, if any, outside musician provided influence for Black Bane, First Degree bared a big grin and explained that the D’Angelo Black Messiah album was the first album in ten years that stimulated his mind. “D’Angelo is the greatest singing and producing entity of all time. I have never heard such funky, sticky, risky, smooth, forward thinking, live music ever. Michael Jackson is the best dancer ever, Phonk Beta is the best rap producer ever, and D’Angelo is the greatest singer/producer of all time, fa sho. I’ve listened to that album 100 times already.” First Degree goes on to justify that D’Angelos latest album Black Messiah is “gleaming with purpose” and “stimulates those that understand”. The D.E. states that Black Messiah is the reason he reached out to Phonk Beta and Eric Otis for live instrumentation.

First Degree also sites the current urban struggle, and a second meeting with hip hop legend Rakim that had influence on his new direction.

If the people take to the Black Bane album like the listeners that this reporter has witnessed, the West Coast rap game will have a new bar to try to live to.

First Degree Black Bane hits stores world-wide October 20, 2015. Live First Degree Black Bane performances will take place in the Seattle and Denver areas in December of 2015, with more locations to be announced. The album is produced by Phonk Beta, with additional production by Oji and Sultan Mir. Fahrenheit Records is distributed by City Hall Records and The Orchard.

More information can be found at FirstDegreeTheDE.com

Black Bane Cover

Fahrenheit Records’ 55th album, First Degree The D.E. “Black Bane” brings purpose to the underground rap game and hits stores October 20, 2015

E-40 Live In Sacramento, From The Eyes Of An O.G.

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E-40 Live In Sacramento, From The Eyes Of An O.G.

By Jimmy Blog For The Fahrenheit Insight

Photos by Fahrenheit Photography

“When I say E, you say 40!”

When I got the text on Mother’s Day from First Degree The D.E., telling us to meet him at E -40’s concert in an hour, I was a little taken back. However, when E-40 is in the buildin’, and First Degree The D.E. is on the move, it pays to keep up!

 

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E-40’s flow is a nice combination of flippin’ and conscious rap

E-40 live is always a rockin’ show. His history in the rap game, along with his all ages, multicultural fan base, makes for a good time. E-40 live celebrates West Coast hip hop culture at its best. His single “Choices” has been a hit in the clubs, the streets, and the radio. E-40 keeps buzz and stays relevant.

 

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Sacramento’s Ace Of Spades has established itself as Sactown’s hottest venue

When The Fahrenheit Insight met up with First Degree The D.E. outside of Ace Of Spades in downtown Sacramento, we asked about the purpose of our attendance at the show. With First Degree The D.E., things are never as simple as they seem. When we discovered the purpose of our trip to the E-40 live Choices Tour, things got interesting.

Before entering Ace Of Spades, our conversation when something like this…

“So D.E., why are we here?” asked the Fahrenheit Insight.
“I don’t know,” responded First Degree.
“Are we here to see E-40 perform his new songs?”                                           “No, it’s more than that.”                                                                                         “Are we here to get a picture with 40?”                                                       “No.”                                                                                                                                    “Are we here to try to get 40 on Black Bane?”

“No, he’d probably too expensive for me. Black Bane is a militant album, I’m not sure if 40 would get down like that. Truth is, I don’t know why we’re here. But when the universe lines up for something important to happen, and for you to be there, you gotta trust the wisdom of the universe, and just go.”

“Ok, Ok. Do you think we’re here so you can one day be on his album?”

“No, again its more than that.” After a long pause, First Degree then explained, “Its about recognition.” He further points out, “Respect. I want to make sure he remembers me and knows what we’re doing now.”

 

e-40 live sacramento e 40 8“When I say E, you say 40!”

e-40 show sacramento first degree the deFirst Degree The D.E. enjoys old school E-40 songs performed. No, really

First Degree The D.E. then describes his long time admiration for E-40. In the late 90’s, First Degree The D.E. and E-40 did a song together on Brotha Lynch Hung’s “Loaded” album. The D.E. went on to explain that E-40 is the most successful rapper/rap CEO in Northern California, and most Northern California rappers look up to him. “I somewhat based my business model after them (Sic Wit It Records).”

Ace Of Spades was packed. Sactown was in full force for E-40 and the Sic Wit It crew. We weren’t expected, but because we were rollin’ with First Degree, we got in free and got premiere seating. Feel me?! It literally pays to be down with Fahrenheit! It was probably the story in Sacramento’s News and Review about the Ace Of Spades Nightclub, First Degree The D.E.,  Ced Sing, and Sacramento rap.

The show started with Nassasary. She is a petite, energetic MC from Florida known for Youtube fame. The crowd showed appreciation to her, her original sound, and flow, by getting into her set and learning her choruses. After her was Strange Music’s Stevie Stone. He had a decent set, displaying a Tech N9ne-like synchronism with his stage partner, and flowing with a MidWest sound. The opening acts did a good job setting the stage for The Man. Once E-40 hit the stage, the crowd erupted!

 

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E-40 had the crowd rockin’, even in the “cheap seats”

 

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 E-40 live has still got it

During his set, E-40 did not disappoint. For the O.G.’s E-40 started with classics like .Sprinkle Me’ and ‘Captain-Save-A-Hoe’. “How many old school E-40 fans out there?!” The crowd rocked, sang along, and reminisced during the popular rap tunes. It was interesting to see the younger audience members sing along to tunes that were hot before their time, a true sign of longevity.

During the hour plus long set, the self-proclaimed Ambassador of the Bay performed his newer singles like “Tell Me When To Go”, his hit with Big Sean “I Don’t (expletive) Wit You”, and his latest hit, “Choices”. It was all to a raucous crowd. Both 40 and his audience left the function full of our hip hop culture, good times, and pride.

Local celebrities filled the venue. Along with First Degree The D.E., Big Roc and Loc2DaBrain was at the spot taking in the scene as well. Big Roc, T-Nutty’s manager, is now managing B-Legit, and doin’ it big like his name. Madesicc Musicc’s Loc2DaBrain crew was promoting their mini movie and EP entitled, “Asylum”. E-40 and Sacramento, brings out the hood stars, is a nice combination. E-40 live is the truth!

 

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Sacramento is a second home to E-40

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E-40 hears his chorus sung by 800 fans

After the show, we caught back up with First Degree The D.E. The D.E. had met with a few hundred fans, handing out free CDs, fliers, and Fahrenheit information. He said he had a good time, but was not done with his evening. “I need to talk to 40.” D.E. declared. OK, here we go.

Somehow, First Degree The D.E. got us past security and backstage after the event. That Fahrenheit gleam shines for rillas! Having performed with Too Short and Smoov-E a few years prior, The D.E. knew his way around the backstage area. We didn’t, and temporarily lost First Degree. The climax of the story was hanging in the balance! However, we eventually found him, outside the dressing room, talking to a group. As we approached First Degree, a couple securtity guards came out of the dressing room to make space, and out came E-40! I was frozen, but The D.E. was not.

E-40 was on a dash from the black SUV that had come to swoop him up. He had been swamped by fans all night, he was ready to go. He was being followed by fans hawking him for selfies. When he was about 10 feet from the SUV, First Degree The D.E. hollers out, “40, it’s First Degree The D.E.!” What E-40 did next, I’ll never forget.

Although E-40 had just rocked Sacramento, and been worn out by fans, when he heard The D.E.’s name he stopped in his tracks and stopped everything to talk to him. I saw it with my own eyes! “Awe, what’s up First Degree!” E-40 was heard greeting D.E. as the two shook hands and hugged. With a reminising, happy look, the two talked for a minute, shook hands again, and then E-40 was off. First Degree The D.E. was the last person E-40 talked to at the venue.

Later, when The Fahrenheit Insight inquired to First Degree about what he and E-40 talked about, he said, “That’s between MCs.”

So close, but so far.

“Did you get what you were looking for?” we asked.

“Yes.”

 

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E-40 “Sharp On All Four Corners” OUT NOW

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First Degree The D.E. “Black Bane” OUT OCTOBER

Bay Area Rapper Abducted By Aliens Explains Abduction

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The “Abduction”
The Fahrenheit Insight Interviews Oji, The Bay Area Rapper Abducted By Aliens, On His Alien Abduction
So, when asked to speak about my u.f.o. abduction, which took place 7 yrs ago while camping at night in Russian River. I was told not to speak about it by those same beings which abducted me. I sometimes see them in dreams and they channel through me speaking in visions. So they asked me to share with you what you need to see. Here is a message too you from them:
“Our wireless neural network is online, as one mind no cell can confine.
Our hallucinogenic skin crystallizes. Symbolizing psychedelic melanin and psilocybins.
Binaural vocabulary of alpha, beta, theta, gamma, delta rays of the sun.
In stereo, hemi sync, adjust your frequency. Get a signal through your nervous system when you tune into us.
Our holographic brains are like an interactive game.
Challenging magnetic attraction to balance yin yang.
Mathematics unravel theories of everything as waves.
Dna climaxes is orgasmic as the big bang.
Whats large as a galaxy though small as an atom?
You might think its magic if you just imagine how reality is miraculously, accurately crafted from the one.
Connecting from one singularity, branching to complexity.
Whether or not you believe, you will see the webs we weave unseparately.”
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You see that my mind has been abducted.
I was notified in a dream with further instructions for this mystery.
If you follow, I am not me. This solidity is watery.
Through your screen I could possibly teleport into your body.
Because, this is interactive.
When you come into contact with it see what happens.
As you analyse, try this exercise:
Stare into the sky until you see a sign. Not to hypnotize, but to re-align the mind.
Demystifying with applied physics to shift the paradigm.
Now harmonize your voice with mines: Ah-oh-mm“.
Oji & The Ascension Team
“Speak N Tones” OUT NOW!
OJI COVER
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Check out the Oji’s single, “A Maze In The Brain” HERE!

The History Of Sacramento Rap (Part One, The Beginning)

DC RAY P FOLKS fahrenheit insight

The History Of Sacramento Rap

Written By First Degree The D.E. & Jimmy Blog For Fahrenheit Insight

Note: Sacramento rap history. After talking with Sacramento’s real rap pioneers, First Degree The D.E. and Fahrenheit columnist Jimmy Blog document the truth about the history of the Sacramento rap game for Fahrenheit Insight in this three part series. For the people!

 

Sacramento Rap History, Part One

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Break dancing was the first Sacramento urban hip hop expression

 

First there was dance, then there was rap.

In the late 70’s, early 80’s, when hip hop as being created at block parties in Brooklyn, New York, Sacramento had break dancers. This was a time that created funky-fresh clothing, break dancing, electric keyboards, boom boxes, heavy drum tracks, and other roots of the hip hop culture. This era gave eventually gave birth to the “Breakin’” movie series, “Krush Groove”, and many more. To be the king of Sacramento in those days, you had to not only know how to pop, but survive and control a dance battle. The main DJ in town was DJ Darryl Dennis, pumping up local events. DJ Darryl was the local star, that was until The Triple Threat Three, which was DC Ray, Mike C and Captain K hit the scene. They were rappin’.

 

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DJ Darryl Dennis & Captain K’s dance single “Sweat”. Check it out here

 

For the record, DC Ray was the first Sacramento rapper, and The Triple Threat Three was the first Sacramento rap group.

Around 1980ish, East Coast pioneers like The Sugar Hill Gang, Grandmaster Flash, Afrika Bambaataa, and Run DMC were creating a genre, defining a culture. Their messages were about fun, respect, and what was going on in the hood. DC Ray and The Triple Threat Three started around this time. As there was high school dance battles, South Sacramento became known for intense rap battles as well. “Burbank was the main battle spot, then MCs from everywhere started comin down,” reflects DC Ray on Fahrenheit Radio’s Fahrenheit Hour Urban Talk Show. Eventually, Sacramento’s unique hip hop style was on display in alleys, house parties, DJ parties, high schools, and dance clubs in the form of freestyle rap. It was pure, urban expression. It was the stuff that created what Sacramento is now known for; hard edged, in your face reality. When the dust settled, DC Ray and the Triple Threat Three became our Sactown representatives. They were 16.

 

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Fahrenheit graphic artist E-Moe getting down with DC Ray in Sacramento

 

During DC Ray’s recent appearance on Fahrenheit Radio’s “Fahrenheit Hour”, First Degree The D.E. mentioned the Rakim show and story they were writing for Fahrenheit Insight. “I was before Rakim!” includes DC Ray. Wow. “Back then, you had to sell your music out the trunk like Too Short,” remembers DC Ray.

 

Sacramento Rap History, Part Two

Once DC Ray became the King Of Urban Sac, the buzz exploded past our Sacramento borders and reached the Bay area and eventually, Los Angeles and New York. It was at this time that Russell Simmons’ Def Jam Records and new rap group Run DMC were blowing up on the East Coast. Run DMC decided to take their block party on the road. That road lead to Sacramento, and in 1983, The Triple Threat Three, Whodini, and Run DMC did a show at The 2nd Level in Sacramento. It was Sacramento’s first big rap show. A 13-year-old Kevin Mann (Brotha Lynch Hung) was front row, and all the local up-and-coming MCs were in the building. The Triple Threat Three turned the party out, getting the attention of Russell Simmons. After the show, Russell Simmons told The Triple Threat Three crew about their new label, Def Jam Records. Russell Simmons offered them a contract with one catch, they had to move to New York. Two of the Triple Threat Three were in, one was out, citing the mystery of Def Jam Records. At the time, Def Jam was still an up-coming label from a coast far away. Since the members of the Triple Threat Three were a group, they stuck together and declined Def Jam’s offer. On the Fahrenheit Hour, First Degree and DC Ray reflect on how the Sacramento rap game could have been much more had they gone to New York.

 

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Russell Simmons brought his Def Jam crew to Sacramento in 1983 in rap’s beginnings, also offering Sactown’s Triple Threat Three a contract

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Run DMC, Whodini, and The Triple Threat Three set the Sactown rap scene ablaze with Sacramento’s first big rap show.

 

In time, DC Ray and The Triple Threat Three’s battle-proven style, grit, and lyrical emphasis had made its way to Cletus Anderson and Saturn Records in Los Angeles. Saturn Records signed The Triple Threat Three and released “Scratch Motion”. Scratch Motion was Sacramento’s first official single in stores! It was 1984. An up-and-coming DJ named Dr. Dre was on the scratch! Yes, THE Dr. Dre scratches on Sacramento’s first rap record, Scratch Motion. There were records, and they were in stores. Sacramento had a hero, much earlier in the rap game than many are aware of.

 

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Sacramento’s first rap song, Triple Threat Three’s “Scratch Motion” You can hear it on Youtube here

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 Dr. Dre of the World Class Wreckin Crew scratched on Sacramento’s first single, “Scratch Motion”

 

On the Fahrenheit Hour episode with DC Ray, First Degree offers, “If you ever get Brotha Lynch real drunk, he’ll tell you the story about how the Triple Threat Three/Run DMC show got him in the rap game for real! Haha. He was in the front row, yada yada yada, he fell in love with the rap game”

“I remember when he was Kevin Ice Cold, what he was going by at the time. C-Bo was just comin up, he’s always been reppin’ that name.” DC Ray recognizes. “I like Brotha Lynch cuz he always gives props bout where it all came from. Its good that there are people like yourself, D.E., to document our history.”

 

Sacramento Rap History, Part Three

After rocking Scratch Motion for a couple years in clubs in town and on the road, the Triple Threat Three crew needed another single. They hit the studio and created a tribute to Marvin Gaye called “We Love You Martin”. It was 1985, and The Triple Threat Three was traveling the coast, turning out shows. Other Sacramento MCs, like Oak Park’s Homicide, The Godfather, Bad Mouth C, and Young Dre D were making names for themselves as well. By this time, the hip hop culture had taken over the city. The hero of the city was on records in stores. DC Ray also had a TV show on Public Access, interviewing stars.

While DC Ray was expanding expectations with his TV show, the next generation of rappers was chiseling their rap skills at the local high schools and street corners. This time, the young generation was mainly battling at Kennedy High in South Sacramento, aka The K-House. As with the generation before it, this next breed of rap battlers would engage after school and the best from other schools would come to test their skills in the arena. Familiar names like Brotha Lynch Hung, C-Bo, Triple Sicx, Luni, Marvaless, First Degree The D.E., Be Gee, AK47, and many more were free-styling their way into Sacramento notoriety.

 

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Sacramento’s Luni Coleone pays respect to DC Ray at a local event

The main hoods contributing to the new underground rap movement was Meadowview, The Garden Blocc (Florin Road), Greenhaven, Oak Park, Del Paso Heights, and Freeport. The Freeport area became a serious rap proving ground. Sac pioneer Ace Mak (Ace Of Spades at the time) was a producer and influenced many of the household names you know of today. “Ace Mak taught me to make beats,” First Degree exclaims. Freeport groups like Black Rage (Ace, AK, and Marvaless) and The Wicked lead the new generation rap underground. The town had something special on the bubble, their own sound, their own buzz, their own chip.

 

Sacramento Rap History, Part Four

In the late 80’s, DC Ray was introduced to Cedric Singleton, a young strategist from Ohio, equally hungry for the game. “Ced Sing” was starting a new label with Robert Foster called Black Market Records. DC Ray and Black Market Records came together and released Black Market’s first single, DC Ray’s “What’s The Matter With Your Life?”. At this time, DC Ray was still the only Sac rapper in stores. Black Market and DC Ray’s relationship eventually got complicated and the two moved on. To this day, there are a few things DC Ray would like to hear Ced Sing say.

 

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Black Market’s first single was DC Ray’s “What’s The Matter With Your Life?”

During the recording of The Fahrenheit Hour, DC Ray states that he would like Ced to clean up the mess he made, admit some of his wrongs, and move forward. “I can see he is trying to make everything right now,” DC Ray defends. “But I could have signed with Atlantic Records!” He then goes on stating that Atlantic Records was interested in him. Atlantic was told DC Ray wasn’t interested. DC Ray suspects someone at Black Market told Atlantic that he wasn’t interested. “We could have done a better job with ‘What’s The Matter With Your Life’,” DC Ray also realizes out loud.

 

dc ray drawing on fahrenheit insight

 

By the early 1990’s, Black Market Records was preparing a take over, They released Homicide and was building their brand. It was then that a young Dalvin Pipkins (eventual owner of Death Trap Records) walked newbies X-Raided and Brotha Lynch Hung into the Black Market office. Also during this time, Bobby T and C-Bo, affiliates with Vallejo underground up-comers E-40 and The Click, were getting their situation together and had big plans of their own. Dalvin, Be Gee, First Degree The D.E., Young Joker, and Phonk Beta were on the verge of making history as well. Colossal things were on the horizon for these rap pioneers and the city of Sacramento.

The actions of these young trailblazers later started the Sacramento rap era you think you know. Do you really know? Find out on part two of “The History Of Sactown Rap”, here on Fahrenheit Insight!

You can hear this interview with DC Ray in its entirety soon on Fahrenheit Radio and Youtube.

 

First Degree The D.E.

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“Fahrenheit Collectibles, Brotha Lynch Hung and First D.E.”
Out Now Digitally, In Stores November 18, 2014!

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United Nations 8.19.14

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Phonk Beta 10.21.14

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First Degree The D.E. and Cold 187 Talk Dr. Dre, Religion, And More

Cold 187 On Fahrenhie tCold 187 On The Fahrenheit Insight

By Jimmy Blog For Fahrenheit Insight

Any true fan of rap music knows about the notorious rap group, Above The Law. Starting in 1989, Above The Law’s (Cold 187um, KMG, Go Mack, and DJ Total K-oss) were pioneers of West Coast rap and invented the G Funk rap era, which was later copied by Dr. Dre’s for “The Chronic”. Backed by Eazy E’s Ruthless Records, Above The Law released hit after hit, creating a world-wide fan base with their real, rap-funk sound. Their most popular albums, “Livin Like Hustlers”, “Black Mafia Life”, and “Uncle Sam’s Curse” carved the West Coast rap scene from within. Above The Law worked with rap legends 2Pac, N.W.A, Kokane, Suge Knight, and many other pioneers. Hits like “Black Superman”, “The Last Song”, and “Murder Rap”, to name just a few, communicated what was going on in Los Angeles at the time. Though his music, Cold 187um because a voice for the inner city Black, West Coast community. As a group, Above The Law released eight albums.

In 1999, Above The Law’s main vocalist, Cold 187um went solo. Know for his aggressive style and stylish, high pitched voice, Cold 187um, aka Big Hutch continued his career with eight more independent albums, including an ill-fated stint with Insane Clown Posse. Cold 187um has continued to be a voice of reason for the West Coast rap game.

On Saturday, May 10th, Cold 187um aka Big Hutch sat down with First Degree The D.E. on The Fahrenheit Hour Urban Talk Show on Fahrenheit Radio. Cold 187um shared his thoughts on racism, current events, major labels, and the state of the rap game.

Cold 187um started the discussion on race and Clippers owner Donald Sterling. He started by explaining that slavery wasn’t that long ago, and that we’re all slaves to something. “I remember being called nigger, by White folk”, he remembers. He goes on to explain that slavery wasn’t that long ago, and the people that were around when the Jim Crow laws were active, are still alive today. He then moves on to Donald Sterling. Sterling is the Clippers own caught on tape making racist comments to his girlfriend. Big Hutch explains that Sterling is just a simple man that is a slave to his environment, adding that if you listen to the whole tape, Sterling is answering to his racists peers, “You’re part of something that’s racist!”. “We’re all slaves to something.” he reiterates. Hutch explains that we need to look towards each other for healing. “We’re the first people that never look at the man in the mirror”.

The Above The Law head man then gets to sharing his experiences with major labels. He has been on Ruthless Records, Tommy Boy Records, Death Row Records, and more. When First Degree The D.E. askes him if good or bad Jews own the major labels, Cold 187um explains that there are both. “Everyone wants to get caught up with calling them devils”. He clarifies that the people that own the major lables (and the fame) are opportunists selling a product. “They lookin at you like you a bag of Doritios! They not lookin at you like you put your heart and soul into somethin!” Cold 187um has hasd many experiences with the majors, but now likes it just where he is, independent with Big Shot Records.

Big Hutch also had something to say about Dr. Dre. Dr Dre is in the mists of becoming hip hop’s first billionaire by teaming up with Apple for his Beats headphones and streaming service. However, Dr Dre got famous from his music, some of which (the g funk) was stolen from Above The Law and Cold 187. “Someone hears that you got a great theory, it’s very innovative, and they know they can go to the next level with it, they take that, and done give credit to the person that created it.” Its all about money Hutch explains. In the end, he and the Above The Law members (RIP KMG) just want the recognition they deserve. Considering Dr Dre is making billions off his legacy now, asking for credit is a reasonable request.

Cold 187 chose not to get into the Illuminati talk, “…because its just that, talk!” Big Hutch would like our urban communities to get real and help each other. “I’m not anit-anything, I just pro doin me!”