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tech n9ne is trying to steal brotha lynch's wife art

Tech N9ne and Brotha Lynch

tech n9ne is trying to steal brother lynchs wifeTech N9ne Is Trying To Steal Brotha Lynch’s Wife

By Jimmy Blog Of The Fahrenheit Record

During First Degree The D.E.’s visit on UGS Radio, Brotha Lynch claims Tech N9ne is after his wife.

On April 14th, 2016, First Degree The D.E. was on The Murder Master Music Show and delivered many surprises, including bringing Brotha Lynch into fray. During the hour and a half long interview, First Degree The D.E. discussed his new album “Black Bane, The Misunderstood Hero”, it’s purpose, it’s musical production, the racial epithets he occasionally uses in songs, being banned from Strange Music, his recently earned Master’s Degree, and much more.

It was near the end of the episode when things took a turn.

About twenty minutes into the episode, First Degree The D.E. surprised hosts Prez B, Mac, and the MMMS audience by having the one and only Brotha Lynch Hung call in. They talked about the two’s relationship, which seems to be mended now, Lynch’s new EP “Bullet Maker”, and to everyone’s surprise, the accusation that Tech N9ne is trying to steal Brotha Lynch’s wife. Lynch asserts on the show, “He won’t stop ’til he gets my wife!” He didn’t go into detail, instead went on detailing his appreciation for Strange Music.

During the interview, Brotha Lynch reflected on his time at Strange Music. Lynch’s latest release, “Bullet Maker”, was released on Lynch’s own label, Madesicc Music. It is unclear if Brotha Lynch’s next full album, “Kevlar”, will be released by Strange Music. Observers of Brotha Lynch and Tech N9ne have noted a unique bond between the two, filled with deep admiration and power riffs.

“During Brotha Lynch’s time with Strange Music, he and Tech N9ne had an interesting relationship. Tech grew up on Lynch, yet Tech owns the label Lynch is now on and has a vast audience of his own now. On the flip side, Lynch is a proud MC with a vast, devoted following, and past label troubles that haunt him to this day” First Degree explains to The Fahrenheit Record. First Degree served as Brotha Lynch’s manager during the Brotha Lynch/Strange Music merger. He includes, “there’s definitely a weird element between Lynch, his wife Lauren, and Tech goin on.” Could Tech N9ne be trying to steal Brotha Lynch’s wife for sport?

In one of Tech N9ne’s singles, “Mental Giant”, Tech N9ne raps that he’s, “narcissistic, dark and wicked”. Was the result of the mix of an MC with an ego, and a proud MC bringing it back, toxic, or historical? The debate will be waged for years, yet only time will tell.

In addition to Tech N9ne Brotha Lynch controversy, First Degree and Lynch gave the audience an inside look into the album making process.

When it came to defining the Black Bane concept, First Degree The D.E. explained that the Black Bane character is a hero for the people. He aimed to inspire and inform, with the type of music that changes the game. He has just completed his Master’s degree in global teaching strategies and was ready to get back into the studio. First Degree’s baritone rap and singing style is unique, truthful and remains cutting edge. He explains that for the music, he relied on Phonk Beta, with guest production by Oji El, Eric Otis, Sultan Mir. “Live piano, live guitar, and inspiration” The D.E. reveals. On the album’s first single, the title track “Black Bane”, First Degree challenges the listener to stand up and fight for somebody. Black Bane is very well put together and has a new, fresh vibe that spews of talent, musical innovation, and time. Prez B of UGS calls Black Bane First Degree’s best album to date. His review can be read HERE.

First Degree went on to address some of the controversy surrounding lyrics on his new “Black Bane” album. Some have taken offense to racial epithets used in his songs. For example, during the interview, host Scott Bejda played “Say Serra” from Black Bane. It included the lines, “(I) gots, the kind of Jews, you can’t refuse. The kind of Japs thats peel ‘yo caps. The kind of spooks, thats put up dukes. The kind of crackas, thats serious backas. The kind of Messicans, thats spill ‘yo ‘intesskins’. The kind of Mooslims, thats make ‘ya dooslims,. The kind of Flips thats flips they whips.” On The Murder Master Music Show, and later with The Fahrenheit Record, The D.E. provides insight into the use of these terms.tech n9ne is trying to steal brotha lynchs wife first degree

First Degree The D.E. uses words like “crackas” and “Moooslims” to bring attention to his message about race

“Ironically, the same people that are sensitive to my use of these words, are the same people that need to hear it,” First Degree The D.E. explains. He also discloses that he represents the underground people, he uses the racial epithets to get peoples attention on the topic, inform, and is sometimes joking. “I get tired on the N-word in songs, and folks repeatin it when they shouldn’t be,” includes The D.E.

The 20 year rap veteran also justifies his lyric, “Can’t give a white bum money, shoulda cashed in on ya privlege, ya dummy!”. This line appears on his latest video, “I Wear Black Cuz Its Just My Style”. First Degree points out that he has in fact given white homeless people money, and hints that the line’s purpose was shed light on white privilege. In the past, First Degree has stirred up racial controversy for his single, “Listen Up, Ya Honkey” from his Super Black album.

“I couldn’t believe he did that,” reveals Brotha Lynch during the interview.

Brotha Lynch Hung was very open during this rare interview he participated in as well. The 27 year rap veteran also updated us on rumors in the Sacramento rap game, including his health, legal troubles, and X Raided’s release. Lynch explained that he was in the hospital last year, and had recovered. He stated that he had gotten so sick that, “my wife said I was walking around with my pants down”. He also talked about recently getting off of probation for nine months and going sober during that time. Now off probation, on the show he proclaimed that he was “real high”. In regards to the rumors that X Raided had been released in prison, Lynch explained the X Raided did not get released, yet has a parole hearing in 120 days. Popular rap news website Sacramentorap.com is normally the first to have the scoop on these type issues. Brotha Lynch also frequently talked about his wife Lauren from her “beatin up every bitch in Sac”, to her cooking.

Brotha Lynch and First Degree had real good things to say about each other. They talked about stimulating each other, their friendship outside the studio, and finding it important to have each other’s input on projects. The two have been making music together for over 20 years, most famously on Lynch’s “Loaded” and First Degree’s “Planet Zero”. In addition, Brotha Lynch hinted at the making of a group album with First Degree, and Phonk Beta, and himself. “Im hopin’ that me and D.E. can put an album together. It’ll be epic because all the classic stuff we’ve done. Fans on my Instagram all day like ‘when you gunna work with D.E. again?'”

A key factor in First Degree and Brotha Lynch working again is his current ban from Strange Music. As a result of juggalo backlash, First Degree The D.E. had been banned from Strange Music’s website and location. On the MMMS, The D.E. stated that he and Strange Music are peers and they should go back to working together. “Strange Music, un-ban me from ya facilities!” proposes First Degree The D.E.

From the “historic” 258th episde of UGS’s Murder Master Music Show, it is obvious that good things are here and to come from Brotha Lynch Hung, First Degree The D.E., and Sacramento rap’s future.

To hear insight into the Brotha Lynch and First Degree, Fahrenheit Radio, and an open discussion on Tech N9ne and Strange Music, click the link for Episode 258 of the Murder Master Music Show HERE.

tech n9ne trying to steal brotha lynchs wife bullet maker

Brotha Lynch Hung “Bullet Maker, and First Degree The D.E. “Black Bane” are available digitally and in retail stores now.

tech n9ne is trying to steal brotha lynch's wife first degree Black Bane Cover

First Degree Black Bane 2

Black Bane Puts Eminem, Tech N9ne, and Brotha Lynch On Notice In New Video

Black Bane Puts Eminem, Tech N9ne, and Brotha Lynch On Notice With New Video

DE SF 2

First Degree The D.E. takes on the Black Bane persona and looks to raise the thought, talent, and purpose in today’s rap music

By Fahrenheit Insight’s Jimmy Blog

   Just when America needs answers, The D.E. provides. In a quest to bolster hip hop consciousness, Sacramento rapper First Degree The D.E. calls out rap heavy weights Eminem, Tech N9ne, and Brotha Lynch in new video, “Black Bane”, which can be seen HERE.

   First Degree The D.E. is a world renowned entertainer/activist and pioneer of Sacramento rap, has performed over 100 shows across the USA, and  is responsible for 55 projects in all. In addition to his uplifting message in the recording booth, First Degree is an active participant in South Sacramento community. The label he owns, Fahrenheit Records, had sold over 80,000 units world-wide , consists of artists stretching the West Coast,  and enjoys a 20 years history of quality, thoughtful, diverse music. Fahrenheit Records operates an award winning, world-wide online radio station called Fahrenheit Radio, and owns and operates 14 websites, including FirstDegreeTheDE.com, Sacramentorap.com, Californiarap.com, and USrapnews.com.

    The Fahrenheit Insight caught up with First Degree during the “I Wear Black Cuz Its Just My Style” video shoot at the 49er’s stadium in Santa Clara, CA. It was a cloudy evening with thousands of raucous, optimistic fans tailgating in the Levi Stadium paring lot for Monday Night Football’s opening of the 2015 season. The D.E.  gave us insight into the history and purpose behind Black Bane, and what it means to be a street vigilante. Who is First Degree Black Bane?

First Degree black bane 3First Degree The D.E. defines conscious lyricism with Fahrenheit’s 55 project, Black Bane The Misunderstood Genius Part 1

   Over his 20 year rap history, First Degree has put on many masks to deliver his message. This includes RoboDE, Blackulem, Shlumpulicious, and Super Black to name a few. Being Fahrenheit Records’ 55th project, the first thing The Fahrenheit Insight wanted to know about Black Bane was what the difference between it all the past First Degree characters.

   “The more things change, the more they stay the same,” First Degree explains. “Like the other recent characters I’ve portrayed on albums, I was told by the universe to take on this persona. I don’t just sit around and decide, ‘I’m gunna do this, or I’m gunna say that.’ God an His universe instructs me to do so, and I oblige.” He then went on to lay out the purpose of Black Bane.

   First Degree The D.E. went all out to detail the characteristics of Black Bane. He explained tat unlike the other characters he’s portrayed, Black Bane sees the world as a grey area, meaning there’s no definitive good or bad, just perspective. “Black Bane is a street vigilante. Once he’s locked onto a goal that’s just, he affiliates with the good and the bad in order to fulfill that purpose. He’s purpose is just, his means are questionable to some.”

Phonk Beta Black Bane

Long time Brotha Lynch producer Phonk Beta goes all the way live with his production on First Degree Black Bane

   When asked about Black Bane’s purpose and goals, First Degree related Black Bane’s vision of a fair society in which opportunities flow equally across all social and economic levels, the people are informed and inspired, and doing his part to help shed the effects of Jim Crow and return the people to the regalness that is within them. “This is what he calls fighting for the people. Black Bane just takes aggressive means and plays the role only he can play, in order to get the job did,” First Degree The D.E. asserts. He concludes, “To deliver this message, I relied on the Great Phonk Beta and challenged him to remind the people what makes him great, and he succeeded with an unbelievable array of superior, live shlumpage.”

When we got in the lab we asked ourselves how we can make this one bigger and better. We achieved that goal with thought, soul, effort, talent, time, patience, and purpose.

The Fahrenheit Record was given a copy of the First Degree Black Bane singles in preparation of this article. They include “Black Bane”, “I Wear Black Cuz Its Just My Style”, and “Say Serra”.

First Degree Black Bane Annimated Face Oji

First Degree Black Bane through the eyes of Oji

Black Bane

The first single is the title track, Black Bane. It starts with First Degree and The Celebration (his kids), telling the story of Black Bane to a dark, aggressive, piano driven, Phonk Beta beat. The first line, “The cost to be boss, atroc-it-ties, that most can’t handle, that’s that’s why you boss, that’s why you bump my blamble, that and rap scandal” provides immediate insight into the mind of Black Bane. The chorus is a daunting 8 bars of dark singing, thunder, and whipping. Black Bane’s lyrics are hard, political, and thoughtful, “Not affected by ISIS, that’s way far, the man’s cookin books here, that’s on our radar.”

The First Degree Black Bane video is another genius animation from Fahrenheit’s Oji, filled with good guys, bad guys, and all in between. The ultra creative video details the many faces and duties of Black Bane and his allies. In addition, the video includes Eminem, Tech N9ne, and Brotha Lynch. When asked why they were included in the video, First Degree explains, “Oji and I saw this video as an opportunity to remind rap’s division leaders to have purpose in their music, before its too late. I’m in cahoots with Lynch as we speak, collaborating on Strange Music’s ‘Kevlar’ album, and that ‘Black Bane Part 2, The Underestimated Villan'”. The D.E. asserts, “its time for the Brotha Lynchs, the Phonk Betas, and the First Degrees to get back together in unison and continue this legacy we’ve created.” He finishes his thought by including that Brotha Lynch was on his way back from Kansas City laying vocals for Strange Music’s Strangulation 2 album, and would will be back at work the Sactown vet as soon as he gets back.

In this single, First Degree raps, “(I’m) banned from Strange Music Inc.” When asked to elaborate, The D.E. declined, citing that it wasn’t the time and a desire to move forward. Why did he put the line in the song, The Fahrenheit Insight wonders.

First Degree Black Bane 2

NFL Network films part of the First Degree The D.E. “I Wear Black Cuz Its Just My Style” video shoot, 49er Stadium with Empire Row

I Wear Black Cuz Its Just My Style

The second single from the Black Bane album is a dedication to West Coast 90’s rap pioneers and the influence it had on world-wide American culture. ‘I Wear Black Cuz Its Just My Style’ is a 90’s style Beta beat with live pianos and live guitar played by L.A.’s Eric Otis. The sound is a nice, unique mix between old school west coast sampling, a live Curtis funk band, and the Straight Outta Cmopton movie. The song’s title and theme came from a 90’s rap group consisting of The D.E.’s good friend Big Ron and Live Wire from the L.A. area.

The “Wear Black’ video was being shot at 49ers Levi Stadium in Santa Clara, California the day of this interview. An official 49er’s tailgating pep rally, thrown by Arevalo Production’s Empire Row, served as the back drop. It was a nationally televised Monday Night Football game and the unveiling of the 49ers’ new black uniforms. It was a wild event, filled with Fahrenheit fans and 49er faithfuls alike. The scene is sure to jump off the camera as soon as the video is completed and released.

First Degree black bane 5First Degree utilizes green screen for the first time in Say Serra

Say Serra

The third Black Bane video is the most musical, lyrical, and entertaining of the bunch.” Say Serra” is a finely-crafted First Degree hit with its own sound and racially controversial lyrics that will have the streets buzzing for some time to come. This single has a hard, groovy, big production, live sound that has never and will never be duplicated. Once again, Phonk Beta is on the beat and live pianos, and Eric Otis is on the live Spanish guitar.

The Say Serra video is all D.E.. First Degree gets close up, entertains, dances, and delivers his unique brand of poetry, “That video’s gunna be up close and personal to leave no doubt what I’m sayin!” Oh boy.

When asked how one picks singles for the album, First Degree reiterates that he is a vessel of the universe and does what it instructs him to do. He also points out that local publication Sacramento News and Review leaked and reviewed one of the songs, ‘The Fahrenheit Record’, HERE. The article included reporter Raheem Hosseini’s funny individual experience with the informative song. The Fahrenheit Record mentions many Sacramento area reporters, and several of them, including the KCRA’s Edie Lambert, Kevin Riggs, and Sacramento Bee’s Chris Macias started the buzz by posting about the song on their Facebook pages.

d'angelo black messiah first degree black bane 8

D’Angelo Black Messiah played a roll in developing First Degree Black Bane

   When asked about what, if any, outside musician provided influence for Black Bane, First Degree bared a big grin and explained that the D’Angelo Black Messiah album was the first album in ten years that stimulated his mind. “D’Angelo is the greatest singing and producing entity of all time. I have never heard such funky, sticky, risky, smooth, forward thinking, live music ever. Michael Jackson is the best dancer ever, Phonk Beta is the best rap producer ever, and D’Angelo is the greatest singer/producer of all time, fa sho. I’ve listened to that album 100 times already.” First Degree goes on to justify that D’Angelos latest album Black Messiah is “gleaming with purpose” and “stimulates those that understand”. The D.E. states that Black Messiah is the reason he reached out to Phonk Beta and Eric Otis for live instrumentation.

First Degree also sites the current urban struggle, and a second meeting with hip hop legend Rakim that had influence on his new direction.

If the people take to the Black Bane album like the listeners that this reporter has witnessed, the West Coast rap game will have a new bar to try to live to.

First Degree Black Bane hits stores world-wide October 20, 2015. Live First Degree Black Bane performances will take place in the Seattle and Denver areas in December of 2015, with more locations to be announced. The album is produced by Phonk Beta, with additional production by Oji and Sultan Mir. Fahrenheit Records is distributed by City Hall Records and The Orchard.

More information can be found at FirstDegreeTheDE.com

Black Bane Cover

Fahrenheit Records’ 55th album, First Degree The D.E. “Black Bane” brings purpose to the underground rap game and hits stores October 20, 2015

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E-40 Live In Sacramento, From The Eyes Of An O.G.

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E-40 Live In Sacramento, From The Eyes Of An O.G.

By Jimmy Blog For The Fahrenheit Insight

Photos by Fahrenheit Photography

“When I say E, you say 40!”

When I got the text on Mother’s Day from First Degree The D.E., telling us to meet him at E -40’s concert in an hour, I was a little taken back. However, when E-40 is in the buildin’, and First Degree The D.E. is on the move, it pays to keep up!

 

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E-40’s flow is a nice combination of flippin’ and conscious rap

E-40 live is always a rockin’ show. His history in the rap game, along with his all ages, multicultural fan base, makes for a good time. E-40 live celebrates West Coast hip hop culture at its best. His single “Choices” has been a hit in the clubs, the streets, and the radio. E-40 keeps buzz and stays relevant.

 

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Sacramento’s Ace Of Spades has established itself as Sactown’s hottest venue

When The Fahrenheit Insight met up with First Degree The D.E. outside of Ace Of Spades in downtown Sacramento, we asked about the purpose of our attendance at the show. With First Degree The D.E., things are never as simple as they seem. When we discovered the purpose of our trip to the E-40 live Choices Tour, things got interesting.

Before entering Ace Of Spades, our conversation when something like this…

“So D.E., why are we here?” asked the Fahrenheit Insight.
“I don’t know,” responded First Degree.
“Are we here to see E-40 perform his new songs?”                                           “No, it’s more than that.”                                                                                         “Are we here to get a picture with 40?”                                                       “No.”                                                                                                                                    “Are we here to try to get 40 on Black Bane?”

“No, he’d probably too expensive for me. Black Bane is a militant album, I’m not sure if 40 would get down like that. Truth is, I don’t know why we’re here. But when the universe lines up for something important to happen, and for you to be there, you gotta trust the wisdom of the universe, and just go.”

“Ok, Ok. Do you think we’re here so you can one day be on his album?”

“No, again its more than that.” After a long pause, First Degree then explained, “Its about recognition.” He further points out, “Respect. I want to make sure he remembers me and knows what we’re doing now.”

 

e-40 live sacramento e 40 8“When I say E, you say 40!”

e-40 show sacramento first degree the deFirst Degree The D.E. enjoys old school E-40 songs performed. No, really

First Degree The D.E. then describes his long time admiration for E-40. In the late 90’s, First Degree The D.E. and E-40 did a song together on Brotha Lynch Hung’s “Loaded” album. The D.E. went on to explain that E-40 is the most successful rapper/rap CEO in Northern California, and most Northern California rappers look up to him. “I somewhat based my business model after them (Sic Wit It Records).”

Ace Of Spades was packed. Sactown was in full force for E-40 and the Sic Wit It crew. We weren’t expected, but because we were rollin’ with First Degree, we got in free and got premiere seating. Feel me?! It literally pays to be down with Fahrenheit! It was probably the story in Sacramento’s News and Review about the Ace Of Spades Nightclub, First Degree The D.E.,  Ced Sing, and Sacramento rap.

The show started with Nassasary. She is a petite, energetic MC from Florida known for Youtube fame. The crowd showed appreciation to her, her original sound, and flow, by getting into her set and learning her choruses. After her was Strange Music’s Stevie Stone. He had a decent set, displaying a Tech N9ne-like synchronism with his stage partner, and flowing with a MidWest sound. The opening acts did a good job setting the stage for The Man. Once E-40 hit the stage, the crowd erupted!

 

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E-40 had the crowd rockin’, even in the “cheap seats”

 

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 E-40 live has still got it

During his set, E-40 did not disappoint. For the O.G.’s E-40 started with classics like .Sprinkle Me’ and ‘Captain-Save-A-Hoe’. “How many old school E-40 fans out there?!” The crowd rocked, sang along, and reminisced during the popular rap tunes. It was interesting to see the younger audience members sing along to tunes that were hot before their time, a true sign of longevity.

During the hour plus long set, the self-proclaimed Ambassador of the Bay performed his newer singles like “Tell Me When To Go”, his hit with Big Sean “I Don’t (expletive) Wit You”, and his latest hit, “Choices”. It was all to a raucous crowd. Both 40 and his audience left the function full of our hip hop culture, good times, and pride.

Local celebrities filled the venue. Along with First Degree The D.E., Big Roc and Loc2DaBrain was at the spot taking in the scene as well. Big Roc, T-Nutty’s manager, is now managing B-Legit, and doin’ it big like his name. Madesicc Musicc’s Loc2DaBrain crew was promoting their mini movie and EP entitled, “Asylum”. E-40 and Sacramento, brings out the hood stars, is a nice combination. E-40 live is the truth!

 

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Sacramento is a second home to E-40

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E-40 hears his chorus sung by 800 fans

After the show, we caught back up with First Degree The D.E. The D.E. had met with a few hundred fans, handing out free CDs, fliers, and Fahrenheit information. He said he had a good time, but was not done with his evening. “I need to talk to 40.” D.E. declared. OK, here we go.

Somehow, First Degree The D.E. got us past security and backstage after the event. That Fahrenheit gleam shines for rillas! Having performed with Too Short and Smoov-E a few years prior, The D.E. knew his way around the backstage area. We didn’t, and temporarily lost First Degree. The climax of the story was hanging in the balance! However, we eventually found him, outside the dressing room, talking to a group. As we approached First Degree, a couple securtity guards came out of the dressing room to make space, and out came E-40! I was frozen, but The D.E. was not.

E-40 was on a dash from the black SUV that had come to swoop him up. He had been swamped by fans all night, he was ready to go. He was being followed by fans hawking him for selfies. When he was about 10 feet from the SUV, First Degree The D.E. hollers out, “40, it’s First Degree The D.E.!” What E-40 did next, I’ll never forget.

Although E-40 had just rocked Sacramento, and been worn out by fans, when he heard The D.E.’s name he stopped in his tracks and stopped everything to talk to him. I saw it with my own eyes! “Awe, what’s up First Degree!” E-40 was heard greeting D.E. as the two shook hands and hugged. With a reminising, happy look, the two talked for a minute, shook hands again, and then E-40 was off. First Degree The D.E. was the last person E-40 talked to at the venue.

Later, when The Fahrenheit Insight inquired to First Degree about what he and E-40 talked about, he said, “That’s between MCs.”

So close, but so far.

“Did you get what you were looking for?” we asked.

“Yes.”

 

E-40 SHOW sacramento e 40 corners cover

E-40 “Sharp On All Four Corners” OUT NOW

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First Degree The D.E. “Black Bane” OUT OCTOBER

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First Degree The D.E. & Fahrenheit Influence French Rap

french rap Ghost DEST

First Degree The D.E. And The Fahrenheit Movement Influence French Rap

The Fahrenheit Insight interviews France’s Ghost D.E.S.T. about First Degree The D.E. and Fahrenheit’s influence on the region

As a result of his 20+ years in rap music, First Degree The D.E. has influenced rap music on a global scale.

As an artist, Sacramento rap veteran First Degree The D.E. has reached a world-wide audience. His 40+  albums and his work with Brotha Lynch Hung, Andre Nickatina, and Tech N9ne, has exposed his unique talents to the world. The Fahrenheit Movement has touched the world as well.

France has one of the worlds fastest growing hip hop scenes. For the past 15 years or so, French musicians have taken American rap, inserted their culture, and created a new sound. The French hip hop sound is gritty, reminiscent of late 90’s American rap music. As a result of being around since the mid 90’s, First Degree The D.E. and The Fahrenheit Movement are influential in French rap, and French rappers.

One of the early French rap organizations was Dez Jakk’s War N Peace crew.  Dez Jakk and the gang have been putting out music since the early 2000’s and have had First Degree The D.E., and Sacramento’s E-Moe, featured on a past album called “The French Connection”.  After War N Peace’s 2010 “Inhale The Peace”,
Dez Jakk stopped making music because of his own religion convictions. The War N Peace crew was then on their own.

french rap Ghost D.E.S.T.

French Rapper Ghost D.E.S.T.

A standout member of the War N Peace corps is Ghost D.E.S.T. Ghost D.E.S.T. is 29, and was born in Roubaix “the poorest city in France”. He and his family have since moved to Switzerland. His lyrics are based on political corruption, geopolitical problems, wars, poverty in the world, the state of hip hop, the fact that weed is not legalize in France.  Ghost’s “I Am Hip Hop” drops in 2015.

Ghost D.E.S.T. proclaims First Degree The D.E. to be his favorite rapper. Ghost has all 40+ First Degree albums and has followed the Fahrenheit Shlangz for over a decade. He states, “We represent the Fahrenheit Movement here in France and Switzerland. We’re waiting for a First Degree The D.E. ‘s European Tour. French people need it!”

First Degree The D.E. hit the French rap scene hard with appearances on Brotha Lynch Hung’s 1997 “Loaded” album. The French hip hop community then experienced “The Big Black Bat” and “Planet Zero”. It was then that many  of the French underground, including Ghost D.E.S.T.,  officially became true First Degree fans.

D.E.S.T. explains he and his community loves Fahrenheit music because of it’s uniqueness. He further justifies, “Nobody does music like First Degree The D.E. How many artist can rap, sing, and make dope instrumentals? It’s much more than music to me, D.E.‘s lyrics are food for thoughts and Fahrenheit music taught me how to be a SUPER ME! My dad and my uncles are true Fahrenheit Shlangaz too! Much respect to artists like Be Gee, Soupbone, E-Moe, D-Dubb and Phonk Beta. R.I.P. P-Folks!”

When asked what makes Fahrenheit and Sacramento rap stand out, he reveals, “I like Sacramento artists like First Degree The D.E. because the music is much more different than all the other West Coast artist. I think that Sac Town artists, especially Fahrenheit music, has a special vibe. The lyric contents are so different. They are deeper and contain a lots of concepts, stories and characters (The Big Black Bat, Shlumpulicious The Jester, Robo D.E.) . This is a unique kind of rap and the mission is to bring back real rap music to hip hop addicts’ ears.

Ghost later includes, “The fact that The Fahrenheit Movement is an underground and urban movement is important to my eyes because that makes me feel like it’s all about the message and not about all the rap cliché. The purpose is to open your mind to another way of thinking, a higher level, another way to live your life, to interact with people. We all can be a part of the solution, but we need to have true leaders, and D.E. his one of mine.”

For those new to The Fahrenheit Movement, Ghost D.E.S.T. recommends First Degree The D.E. classic songs like “Link In The Chain”, “Open Wide”,  “Watchin’ My Life Go”, “You’ve Gone And Did It”,  “You Ain’t F*&# Wit My Time”, and “Bang!”. The Fahrenheit music and purpose can be sampled on Fahrenheit Radio, available at FahRadio.com, iTunes Radio, Windows Radio, and Tune In. Many First Degree videos are on Youtube as well.

With a mix of consistency, good music, purpose, and conscious lyrics, First Degree The D.E. and The Fahrenheit Movement has become a major factor in French rap and global rap music.

An Interview by Jimmy Blog of The Fahrenheit Insight

FahInsight.com

brotha lynch hung first degre beef fahrenheit collectibles

Brotha Lynch Hung & First Degree The D.E.

“Fahrenheit Collectibles”

OUT NOW!

bay area rapper abducted by aliens 3

Bay Area Rapper Abducted By Aliens Explains Abduction

bay area rapper abducted by aliens 3
The “Abduction”
The Fahrenheit Insight Interviews Oji, The Bay Area Rapper Abducted By Aliens, On His Alien Abduction
So, when asked to speak about my u.f.o. abduction, which took place 7 yrs ago while camping at night in Russian River. I was told not to speak about it by those same beings which abducted me. I sometimes see them in dreams and they channel through me speaking in visions. So they asked me to share with you what you need to see. Here is a message too you from them:
“Our wireless neural network is online, as one mind no cell can confine.
Our hallucinogenic skin crystallizes. Symbolizing psychedelic melanin and psilocybins.
Binaural vocabulary of alpha, beta, theta, gamma, delta rays of the sun.
In stereo, hemi sync, adjust your frequency. Get a signal through your nervous system when you tune into us.
Our holographic brains are like an interactive game.
Challenging magnetic attraction to balance yin yang.
Mathematics unravel theories of everything as waves.
Dna climaxes is orgasmic as the big bang.
Whats large as a galaxy though small as an atom?
You might think its magic if you just imagine how reality is miraculously, accurately crafted from the one.
Connecting from one singularity, branching to complexity.
Whether or not you believe, you will see the webs we weave unseparately.”
bay area rapper abducted by aliens 2
You see that my mind has been abducted.
I was notified in a dream with further instructions for this mystery.
If you follow, I am not me. This solidity is watery.
Through your screen I could possibly teleport into your body.
Because, this is interactive.
When you come into contact with it see what happens.
As you analyse, try this exercise:
Stare into the sky until you see a sign. Not to hypnotize, but to re-align the mind.
Demystifying with applied physics to shift the paradigm.
Now harmonize your voice with mines: Ah-oh-mm“.
Oji & The Ascension Team
“Speak N Tones” OUT NOW!
OJI COVER
bay area rapper abducted by aliens oji 1
Check out the Oji’s single, “A Maze In The Brain” HERE!
sacramento rap HISTORY 3 fahrenheit insight

The History Of Sacramento Rap (Part Three, The Fall)

sacramento rap HISTORY 3 fahrenheit insight

The History Of Sacramento Rap (Part Three, The Fall)

Written By First Degree The D.E. & Jimmy Blog For Fahrenheit Insight

 

Note: To prepare for part three of this series, First Degree The D.E. and Fahrenheit Insight’s Jimmy Blog sat down with Black Market’s Cedric Singleton and Fahrenheit affiliate Unc Imo. The purpose was to learn more about the fall of Sacramento rap, and what we can do to get back on top.

 

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Sacramento Rap History, Part Twelve 

What goes up, must come down.

During Sacramento’s rap peak in the 90’s, people were working together. Artists were on labels, labels and artists worked together pioneering a genre, and crews were hitting the road, spreading the word. After the dust had settled, Brotha Lynch Hung emerged as the new King of Sacramento rap music.

It was then that a plague rolled into Sacramento. That plague was ego. The ego plague would lead to the fall of Sacramento rap music as we knew it. In the 90’s, Sacramento’s big dog record label was still Black Market Records.

Although Black Market was selling thousands of units partnered with Priority Records, the Black Market/Priority relationship had gone sour. Fortunately for Ced Sing and Black Market, another major record label, Tommy Boy Records, had interest in distributing Black Market music. Tommy Boy Records wanted to go all out for Brotha Lynch and Black Market Records.

“Tommy Boy was ready to go, radio, they were prepared to do a movie, they were ready to do all of these things to promote Brotha Lynch. During that crucial time, he decided he doesn’t want to do the deal, cuz other people are spittin in his ear, saying we can do better for you,” Black Market’s Cedric Singleton reflects in anguish on The Fahrenheit Hour Urban Talk Show. Ced also accuses Priority of putting distrust of Black Market in Lynch’s ear.

Brotha Lynch Hung thought he was ready to run a record label. Boy, was he wrong.

“Now, this is where the third part of the series, The Fall Of Sacramento Rap, will start, with this very moment.” painfully cries First Degree The D.E. on The Fahrenheit Hour.

Brotha Lynch began thinking Black Market was taking advantage of him. A year after signing a 5 year deal with Black Market for big money (wanna find out how much, Fahrenheit Hour with Ced Sing), Lynch wanted out.

“My problem with Lynch is you signed a deal. and if you didn’t want deal, you should just turn in your records (4 more) and you’d be free to go, like X-Raided did,” Ced Sing rationalizes. Ced explains he’s given Lynch hundreds of thousands of dollars. However, later in the Fahrenheit Hour episode, Ced admits mistakes.

“I was there when he (Lynch) signed and got a check for (find out on Ced Sing’s feature on The Fahrenheit Hour).” First Degree reports.

Many people don’t understand that during this time, Ced Sing was in his 20’s, early 30’s, and was still wet behind the ears. “A lot people thought I knew about the music business like I know now, I didn’t know then, a lot of thing I had to learn.” Ced admits on The Fahrenheit Hour. “A lot of information I got from my attorney was actually bad information.” However, the damage, or perception of damage, was already done.

tommy boy fahrenheit insight

 “If Brotha Lynch’s career had a turning point, that was his turning point,” reflects Cedric Singleton about Lynch’s refusal to participate in the Tommy Boy deal

Sacramento Rap History, Part Thirteen

Brotha Lynch was ready to move on from Black Market Records. Lynch Hung had decided he didn’t need Black Market and wanted to start his own label with manager, Art B. They did and called it Siccmade Musicc. Lynch and Art were co-owners. Based on Broth Lynch’s name, they got nation-wide distribution by Ground Level. With all that was going on in Sacramento’s music scene, Siccmade Musicc was a serious factor. However, things weren’t the same as they were.

During Sac rap’s peak, there was unity and deals were getting made for hundreds of thousands of dollars. Yes, it was a more profitable, pre-download era in the music industry, however, the money was coming from the people and the new, world-wide interest of Sacramento rap. Around this time, C-Bo left AWOL, X-Raided left Black Market, Hollow Tip left High Side, and Fahrenheit was doing it alone. It was a local disease of division. However, there was a new rap family in Sacramento, the Siccmade family.

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 The Siccmade Family

 

The Siccmade crew included Brotha Lynch, Art B, Phonk Beta, Zigg Zagg, C.O.S., Sicx, P-Folks, Loki, Big Reg, Tall Can G, D-Dubb, E Moe, and more. They ended up releasing 15 albums with both Ground Level and IDN, based out of New York. They enjoyed success, but it was a fraction of the income Black Market was achieving in it’s heyday. Siccmade was bringing in tens of thousands of dollars, selling cds, and occasionally, doing shows. With Phonk Beta still on the beats, the Siccmade sound was still in tact, with albums like Head Drama and Brotha Lynch Hung’s “Lynch By Inch”. Lynch’s transition from Black Market to Siccmade appeared somewhat smooth, at first.

In 2001, Siccmade artist Triple Sicx, was  charged and convicted of child molestation. Sicx’s actions were an embarrassment to Siccmade and caused division. However, the Siccmade machine rolled on.

 

brotha lynch lynch by inch fahrenheit insight

 Brotha Lynch’s “Lynch By Inch” was Siccmade’s most successful album

After burning bridges with Art B and IDN, Brotha Lynch started Madesicc Musicc. He had to change the name of his label because Art B was 50% owner of Siccmade. Current day, Madesicc is Lynch’s label. Their main artists include a reboot of Loc To Da Brain, with members G-Macc, 8 Ball, Da KAT, and Hyst. Other artists include Calico 101, Devious, Loco Ricc, Vamp Loc, Nicci Blacc, and Tanqueray Loc. The label has released a G-Macc’s “Opera/Angels & Demons”, however, Madesicc Musicc has released only a fraction of the albums Siccmade Musicc released.

Every Brotha Lynch label project has gotten worse and worse. The Madesicc/Siccmade brand is popular, yet has become watered down. Now-a-days, several entities from near and far, “claim” the Madesicc brand, even if their music isn’t own by Madesicc Musicc. Part of this is due in part to Lynch’s hard time saying no to people.

During Be Gee’s recent #Be40 event in Elk Grove, Ca, an impromptu round table of Sacramento rap history was formed. This round table included Cedric Singleton, First Degree The D.E., Death Trap’s Dalvin Pipkins, and the Fahrenheit Insight. As you can imagine, may topics were discussed, including Sacramento’s glorious rap history. Brotha Lynch was also brought up. At one point in the discussion, round table  members discussed the shady things Brotha Lynch had done to each of them. It was a very eventful, funny conversation.

 

Sacramento Rap History, Part Fourteen

As the writer of his own destiny, and no longer under the protection of the Black Market machine, Brotha Lynch gained a reputation of being difficult to deal with. In the Sacramento streets, Brotha Lynch was becoming known for being soft and started to get dissed on songs. Some of the artists dissing Lynch in songs were T-Nutty, Smigg Dirty,  M Sane, and Chill Bola. Lynch’s business partners also found it hard to work with him. However, many fascinated local  “artists” came around Lynch, just to do so. There was always a lot of people wanting to be around Lynch. Lynch was still the king. However, he was a difficult one.

First Degree The D.E. remembers Lynch’s ex-wife Zigg Zagg saying during a San Diego show, “Brotha Lynch can be your greatest asset, and your greatest crutch,”

“Tryin to throw him shows and what not, he’d act like a child, riddled with anxiety. The dumbest things happened on the road, because of Lynch” First Degree The D.E. states. “It was that point that the secret was out. The king of Sacramento was an idiot.” First Degree declares to Fahrenheit Insight. “Having the king of Sac be an idiot was bad for business.”

For those that knew, Brotha Lynch Hung was exposed. For those that didn’t, everything was the same. Despite the rumors, Lynch fans were still fanatic.

“It got the point were we’d all be together, on the road, meeting or whatever, and as soon as Kev (Brotha Lynch) left the room, everyone would talk bout how dumb he was,” First Degree reminisces. “I can remember driving to a Strange Music video shoot for Lynch. We were already late, in a new city, Strange Music’s Travis O’Guin whining on the phone, and Lynch suddenly needs Spiderman Band Aids. Travis O’Guin in panic mode, threatening to cancel the video and Lynch’s deal, and Lynch is demanding we make a stop for some damn Spiderman Band Aids at a strip mall. It was one of those many times where I had to wake him out of his stupidity, for the sake of the city.”

First Degree goes on, stating that Brotha Lynch always complained about people using him. Maybe he’s right, maybe he’s wrong. Perhaps Brotha Lynch is trying to help everyone. Perhaps he is the one using his friends.

“He was so afraid of everything. I remember being at a show with Lynch and members of the Madesicc crew. A Black fan with a quirky scar on his eye, came up to us and said, ‘are you Brotha Lynch and First Degree?’ He then pulled out a Planet Zero CD. I said yes, and we chatted a minute. He then turned to Lynch and Lynch pretended not to be himself. Lynch was hiding behind his friend, giving a fake name, practically shivering. It was very odd. If this had been a juggalo, Lynch would have embraced him. But Lynch is afraid of everything,” First Degree The D.E. adds.

brotha lynch ebk4 fahrenheit insight

Black Market’s non-Lynch, Lynch album EBK4 debuted at #4 on Billboard, even thought Lynch didn’t directly participate in it’s creation

Although Brotha Lynch had left Black Market, Black Market continued releasing Lynch albums. Prior to Loaded in ’97, Brotha Lynch signed a 5 year deal with Black Market, and Ced intended to follow through, with or without Lynch. The first of the non-Lynch, Lynch albums was EBK4. Despite being pieced together by Black Market, it debuted at #4 on the Billboard charts! Black Market went to make 5 or so more Brotha Lynch albums this way, including greatest hits albums, achieving mild success compared to the past.

On Fahrenheit Hour, Cedric Singleton explains that he got the songs for the post-Lynch, Lynch albums by buying songs Lynch had done for other people.

Brotha Lynch has always suspected Black Market got songs by taking them in an armed home invasion that occurred at Lynch’s house. According to witnesses, five or six armed, masked men entered Brotha Lynch’s house. Lynch jumped out of the window, leaving everyone behind. The men tied everyone up and stole all the reel-to-reels and ADATS (tapes used for recording) they could find. Lynch has stated that he’s heard songs taken in that robbery on Black Market non-Lynch, Lynch albums.  Brotha Lynch’s ex-wife Zigg Zagg has since released a song about the incident, scolding Lynch for jumping out of the window and leaving them behind.

After setting off on a mission to own his music, Brotha Lynch ended up owning very little. His label Madesicc, has released only released a few albums in several years of existence. Even with Art B. and E Moe’s resurrection of Siccmade Musicc, Brotha Lynch is not involved, recently tweeting on Twitter, “This nigga emoe3000 a foo! Naw he not talkin to me he talkin to First Degree the DE”

 

Sacramento Rap History, Part Fifteen

C-Bo fahrenheit insight

 In C-Bo’s second act of his career, he looked to expand his horizons in L.A.

c bo The_Final_Chapter fahrenheit insightC-Bo’s Final Chapter was his last with AWOL Records

As with Brotha Lynch, in the late 90’s, C-Bo broke away from his label, AWOL, and formed his own, West Coast Mafia Records. West Coast Mafia successfully released 25+ albums, including releases from C-Bo, Mob Figaz, Ms. Marvaless, Yukmouth, and more. Managed by Nuchie from Meadowview in Sacramento, C-Bo was constantly on the road, promoting, doing shows, and making big money. C-Bo enjoyed a successful transition from AWOL to his own label, until the trials.

During this time. C-Bo went to jail for a parole violation, stemming from anti-police lyrics. On rap site HipHopDX, C-Bo said, “I went through that. It’s already in the book. It’s already written. That can never be an issue, it’s a First Amendment right. They already tried me. They can’t try nobody else, ’cause it’s already been done.”

In 2012, C-Bo went to jail again, this time in Kansas, stemming from a marijuana sales conviction. Although West Coast Mafia Records had success releasing many albums, running the business, dealing with cases, and jail trips took its toll on C-Bo and West Coast Mafia Records. However to this day, C-Bo boasts of being part of 2.5 million record sales. That is a lot. West Coast Mafia Records has been a bigger success than Brotha Lynch’s, post-Black Market, labels.

 

brotha lynch c bo fahrenheit insight

In 2001, David Weiner, working at JCOR Records, pulled off one of the greatest Sacramento rap feats of all time, a Brotha Lynch, C-Bo album. The two weren’t in the studio together when the album was made. It reached #79 on Billboard charts. It featured a young, hungry Tech N9ne

 

 Sacramento Rap History, Part Sixteen

brotha lynch dinner movie fahrenheit insoght

Strange Music’s first Brotha Lynch Hung album “Dinner And A Movie” enjoyed a somewhat successful release. It was a chance to bring national attention to the Sacramento sound again. Instead, Brotha Lynch went with Strange Music’s sound. Brotha Lynch was managed by First Degree The D.E. at the time, as stated in the inside cover of the album

Next came what many call the official end of Sacramento rap. “I feel bad because I had a part in it,” First Degree The D.E. admits. “I helped for the city of Sacramento, though.” Brotha Lynch signed with Strange Music.

In 2009, Brotha Lynch reconnected with David Weiner, now Vice President of Strange Music. Strange Music is a record label based out of Kansas City, Mo, owned by Travis O’Guin and Tech N9ne. Strange Music got its start by tapping into ICP’s fan base, called juggalos. Juggalos are known to be grudge, rowdy Caucasians, not your typical rap audience. On many occasions, Tech N9ne has mentioned that he grew up idolizing Brotha Lynch’s music. After unsuccessfully trying to sign Lynch for many years, Strange was able to sign him in 2009. It was the beginning of the end for Sac.

By this time, Brotha Lynch’s work ethic was really bad, and Strange Music’s demands were high. After being signed to Strange Music for six months, Brotha Lynch still hadn’t submitted any songs to them, despite several attempts from Strange. In addition, Loaded and Season Of The Siccness were involved in bankruptcy (which Ced Sing later regrets) and had been taken off the shelves.

This lead to Brotha Lynch, Loki (Lynch’s manager at the time, one of many of Lynch’s career), Dave Weiner of Strange, and the Davis bankruptcy lawyer asking First Degree The D.E. to manage Brotha Lynch to help get things going. First Degree accepted the challenge, the two agreed on 20%, and D.E. got the ball rolling. He drove Brotha Lynch to Kansas City several times and did what had to be done to get Dinner and a Movie out. He also frequently met with the bankruptcy lawyer and successfully got Loaded and Season back on the shelf, with both Lynch and Ced Sing getting a piece. Although Dinner And A Movie didn’t enjoy the success prior Lynch albums did, it still did rather well.

The First Degree/Brotha Lynch relationship became rocky due to, what First Degree claims, a breach of the managing agreement. Many have chimed in. As a result, ‘First Degree Brotha Lynch beef’ is a popular search on Google. “He asked me to manage him, he was supposed to pay me 20%, I got him paid, he disappeared. That’s the root of the problem, that’s Brotha Lynch,” declares First Degree The D.E. to Fahrenheit Insight. This lead to the release of FU4’s comical single, Lynch Roast. “You won’t pay me my money, but your fans will!” sings First Degree The D.E. in Lynch Roast.

“Stop tellin’ people I owe you,” Brotha Lynch demands of First Degree The D.E. through social media.

Brotha Lynch went on to release three albums with Strange Music, all pretending to be a serial killer. To the juggalos, the albums were great. The traditional Lynch fans were left behind claiming the album sounded too fake, and lost the Sacramento sound. These traditional Lynch fans were disappointed because the new sound was not consistent with his career. Smooth, hard-hitting, soulful Phonk Beta beats were replaced by rocky, loud Strange Music beats. Lynch’s flow was precise, but even more fake. The Brotha Lynch we all knew was lost in the name of “progress”. Sacramento had officially lost its identity.

 

Sacramento Rap History, Part Seventeen

first degree big black bat fahrenheit insight

First Degree The D.E. and Pooman Dre worked magic together on “The Big Black Bat” album

Fahrenheit Records fought to keep the tradition of Sacramento music alive. Their members included First Degree The D.E., Be Gee, Soupbone, Crucial Point, Pooman Dre, and M Sane. As of now, they have released over 40 albums world-wide, more than any other label in Sacramento’s enriched history. After Planet Zero, Damn That D.E., FU1, and The Big Black Bat, First Degree The D.E. left long time Bay Area producer Pooman Dre behind, once again following the Sacramento mistake of thinking he could do it himself. Many say The D.E.’s music got too weird, lost quality, and became hard to follow after that. Also, M Sane abruptly retired after just a few albums. However, Fahrenheit Records was still on the rise. First Degree and Fahrenheit’s success in the 2000’s can be attributed to the 100+ shows First Degree performed nation-wide with Bay Area legends Andre Nickatina, Equipto, and Smoov-E.

Although Fahrenheit Records has rebounded nicely in recent years, First Degree has gotten more controversial and racially charged. First Degree The D.E.’s last solo album “Super Black, The Voice Of The Voiceless” has a song named, “Listen Up, Ya Honkey!” He calls it a guide to racial respect. “Believe it or not, its about folks showin’ respect and getting’ along,” First Degree explains. Fahrenheit has since gotten into producing urban news, online radio, and continues to release albums. However,  Fahrenheit Records has never caught up to the success and notoriety of First Degree The D.E., the artist.

“A lot of people believe that they could be their own record label, and with that lead to the decline of music in Sacramento. You look at the artists that were able to achieve the greatest level of success, those were artists that were on record labels.” Black Market’s Ced Sing summarizes.

 

Sacramento Rap History, Part Eighteen

Oh, what could have been.

On Fahrenheit Radio’s Fahrenheit Hour, First Degree The D.E. sums up the Sacramento music roller coaster experience. “Everybody started going in their own directions (the fall), and when the rise happened, everyone was working together, and thats what I’ve learned in this process.”

On his appearance on the Fahrenheit Hour, Ced Sing wonders out loud why Brotha Lynch left his home label to go to other labels, “and eventually become Tech N9ne’s fuck boy.” declares First Degree The D.E. on the the episode. Ced then suggests that he could understand if Lynch was trying to own his own music, but he wasn’t. Had the Tommy Boy, Black Market, Brotha Lynch connection come together, the possibilities in the region would have been endless. To this day, Brotha Lynch has little to show from all the albums he created since leaving Black Market.

Why do we fall, so we can get back up.

Although Sacramento music is not in the lime light anymore, there is still hope. Fahrenheit affiliate Unc Imo suggests the movers and shakers in Sacramento get on the same page together. He also asserts to, “help in your community because thats your village.”

“Im ready to get it going again,” Ced Sing declares. After doing humanitarian work in 60 countries, Ced is ready to get back into the music saddle. He states that experiences in Africa changed him. “I love Sacramento, (and) even though I have beef with Brotha Lynch. Its hard for me to say something bad about him, because without him there would be no Black Market . At the end of the day, Brotha Lynch’s life’s better, and so is mine.”

Black Market’s Cedric Singleton thinks Sactown rap is on the come-up again. First Degree The D.E. also predicts Sacramento rap will bubble once again in the near future, if the nerve centers start working together again. “It goes back to what I was saying’, people working together and it being true and it being real. Lynch catering to juggalos or what ever they call themselves, that is not real. That is not true.” First Degree manifests on The Fahrenheit Hour.

A good start to the re-rise of Sacramento music would be a new Phonk Beta produced Brotha Lynch Hung song. That’s were it all began, talented Sacramento artists, working with Sacramento producers, giving birth to that Sacramento sound.

However, to truly resurrect Sacramento’s musical legacy, new trails must be paved, like the pioneers did before them.

Does the make of the man (or woman) behind the music matter?

Sacramento rap history has too many missed opportunities. Don’t miss opportunities over ego.

As individuals, Sacramento rap will fail. Let the tales of Sacramento rap music serve as a lesson to the world. Working together breeds success. Like birds flocking.

Sacramento rap history is valued world-wide. Just about every hip hop lover in the world has discovered Sacramento rap at some point. Let’s keep it that way.

For this article, Fahrenheit Insight documented Brotha Lynch Hung’s career and labels, C-Bo’s career and labels, Black Market Records, and First Degree The D.E.’s Fahrenheit  Records because they are Sacramento’s longest lasting, most consistent artists and labels in the history on Sacramento rap music. However, there are many others that had their hand the history of Sacramento rap music, which leads us to ask…

Who will be the next king of Sac?

Other contributors to Sacramento rap history include…

T-Poe, Cris Crump, Brent Stafford, Jeff Dixon, Waynee Wayne, Thick And Thin Studios, Paradise Studios, Daniel Hubbard, Marky Mark & Livewire Studios, Walter & City Hall Records, Pooman Studios, J Dubb, Teabone, Debonair, Nick Peace, St Nick, Lavish D, W.I.L.L., Jackie Moore & Sactown Raps, Curbside, United Nations, G Idez, Foe Loco, Young Meek, Who Put Sac On The Map and Black Armor Records, Twamp Dog, Shagzilla, Polo, Smigg Dirty, Blackjack, Young Bop, Bread, GP The Beast, Thomas & Robin Gonzales, Push, Big O, C-Dubb, Bueno, Brown Hustlas, Mozzy, Lavish D, Tony Endz, Liq Sto, Flossalini, Skanless, Lil Pig, Young Jayda, Young Ridah, PCP, Dub Sac, Big Ron, Crisis, D-Dubb, CRISIS, Royal Mixxers, Nasty Train, Big Ron D, Beat Boyz The CUF, DJ Eddie Edul, DJ Brain Tedlos, Don Blanco, The Sactown Blood and Crips, and more.

 

Fahrenheit Insight’s “The History Of Sacramento Rap” thrives to be the most accurate account of Sacramento rap music ever. Thank you for being a part.

 

 

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 First Degree The D.E. “Fahrenheit Collectibles, Brotha Lynch Hung & First D.E.” OUT NOW Digitally, In Record Stores 11.18.14!

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DC RAY P FOLKS

The History Of Sacramento Rap (Part One, The Beginning)

DC RAY P FOLKS fahrenheit insight

The History Of Sacramento Rap

Written By First Degree The D.E. & Jimmy Blog For Fahrenheit Insight

Note: Sacramento rap history. After talking with Sacramento’s real rap pioneers, First Degree The D.E. and Fahrenheit columnist Jimmy Blog document the truth about the history of the Sacramento rap game for Fahrenheit Insight in this three part series. For the people!

 

Sacramento Rap History, Part One

break

Break dancing was the first Sacramento urban hip hop expression

 

First there was dance, then there was rap.

In the late 70’s, early 80’s, when hip hop as being created at block parties in Brooklyn, New York, Sacramento had break dancers. This was a time that created funky-fresh clothing, break dancing, electric keyboards, boom boxes, heavy drum tracks, and other roots of the hip hop culture. This era gave eventually gave birth to the “Breakin’” movie series, “Krush Groove”, and many more. To be the king of Sacramento in those days, you had to not only know how to pop, but survive and control a dance battle. The main DJ in town was DJ Darryl Dennis, pumping up local events. DJ Darryl was the local star, that was until The Triple Threat Three, which was DC Ray, Mike C and Captain K hit the scene. They were rappin’.

 

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DJ Darryl Dennis & Captain K’s dance single “Sweat”. Check it out here

 

For the record, DC Ray was the first Sacramento rapper, and The Triple Threat Three was the first Sacramento rap group.

Around 1980ish, East Coast pioneers like The Sugar Hill Gang, Grandmaster Flash, Afrika Bambaataa, and Run DMC were creating a genre, defining a culture. Their messages were about fun, respect, and what was going on in the hood. DC Ray and The Triple Threat Three started around this time. As there was high school dance battles, South Sacramento became known for intense rap battles as well. “Burbank was the main battle spot, then MCs from everywhere started comin down,” reflects DC Ray on Fahrenheit Radio’s Fahrenheit Hour Urban Talk Show. Eventually, Sacramento’s unique hip hop style was on display in alleys, house parties, DJ parties, high schools, and dance clubs in the form of freestyle rap. It was pure, urban expression. It was the stuff that created what Sacramento is now known for; hard edged, in your face reality. When the dust settled, DC Ray and the Triple Threat Three became our Sactown representatives. They were 16.

 

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Fahrenheit graphic artist E-Moe getting down with DC Ray in Sacramento

 

During DC Ray’s recent appearance on Fahrenheit Radio’s “Fahrenheit Hour”, First Degree The D.E. mentioned the Rakim show and story they were writing for Fahrenheit Insight. “I was before Rakim!” includes DC Ray. Wow. “Back then, you had to sell your music out the trunk like Too Short,” remembers DC Ray.

 

Sacramento Rap History, Part Two

Once DC Ray became the King Of Urban Sac, the buzz exploded past our Sacramento borders and reached the Bay area and eventually, Los Angeles and New York. It was at this time that Russell Simmons’ Def Jam Records and new rap group Run DMC were blowing up on the East Coast. Run DMC decided to take their block party on the road. That road lead to Sacramento, and in 1983, The Triple Threat Three, Whodini, and Run DMC did a show at The 2nd Level in Sacramento. It was Sacramento’s first big rap show. A 13-year-old Kevin Mann (Brotha Lynch Hung) was front row, and all the local up-and-coming MCs were in the building. The Triple Threat Three turned the party out, getting the attention of Russell Simmons. After the show, Russell Simmons told The Triple Threat Three crew about their new label, Def Jam Records. Russell Simmons offered them a contract with one catch, they had to move to New York. Two of the Triple Threat Three were in, one was out, citing the mystery of Def Jam Records. At the time, Def Jam was still an up-coming label from a coast far away. Since the members of the Triple Threat Three were a group, they stuck together and declined Def Jam’s offer. On the Fahrenheit Hour, First Degree and DC Ray reflect on how the Sacramento rap game could have been much more had they gone to New York.

 

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Russell Simmons brought his Def Jam crew to Sacramento in 1983 in rap’s beginnings, also offering Sactown’s Triple Threat Three a contract

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Run DMC, Whodini, and The Triple Threat Three set the Sactown rap scene ablaze with Sacramento’s first big rap show.

 

In time, DC Ray and The Triple Threat Three’s battle-proven style, grit, and lyrical emphasis had made its way to Cletus Anderson and Saturn Records in Los Angeles. Saturn Records signed The Triple Threat Three and released “Scratch Motion”. Scratch Motion was Sacramento’s first official single in stores! It was 1984. An up-and-coming DJ named Dr. Dre was on the scratch! Yes, THE Dr. Dre scratches on Sacramento’s first rap record, Scratch Motion. There were records, and they were in stores. Sacramento had a hero, much earlier in the rap game than many are aware of.

 

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Sacramento’s first rap song, Triple Threat Three’s “Scratch Motion” You can hear it on Youtube here

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 Dr. Dre of the World Class Wreckin Crew scratched on Sacramento’s first single, “Scratch Motion”

 

On the Fahrenheit Hour episode with DC Ray, First Degree offers, “If you ever get Brotha Lynch real drunk, he’ll tell you the story about how the Triple Threat Three/Run DMC show got him in the rap game for real! Haha. He was in the front row, yada yada yada, he fell in love with the rap game”

“I remember when he was Kevin Ice Cold, what he was going by at the time. C-Bo was just comin up, he’s always been reppin’ that name.” DC Ray recognizes. “I like Brotha Lynch cuz he always gives props bout where it all came from. Its good that there are people like yourself, D.E., to document our history.”

 

Sacramento Rap History, Part Three

After rocking Scratch Motion for a couple years in clubs in town and on the road, the Triple Threat Three crew needed another single. They hit the studio and created a tribute to Marvin Gaye called “We Love You Martin”. It was 1985, and The Triple Threat Three was traveling the coast, turning out shows. Other Sacramento MCs, like Oak Park’s Homicide, The Godfather, Bad Mouth C, and Young Dre D were making names for themselves as well. By this time, the hip hop culture had taken over the city. The hero of the city was on records in stores. DC Ray also had a TV show on Public Access, interviewing stars.

While DC Ray was expanding expectations with his TV show, the next generation of rappers was chiseling their rap skills at the local high schools and street corners. This time, the young generation was mainly battling at Kennedy High in South Sacramento, aka The K-House. As with the generation before it, this next breed of rap battlers would engage after school and the best from other schools would come to test their skills in the arena. Familiar names like Brotha Lynch Hung, C-Bo, Triple Sicx, Luni, Marvaless, First Degree The D.E., Be Gee, AK47, and many more were free-styling their way into Sacramento notoriety.

 

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Sacramento’s Luni Coleone pays respect to DC Ray at a local event

The main hoods contributing to the new underground rap movement was Meadowview, The Garden Blocc (Florin Road), Greenhaven, Oak Park, Del Paso Heights, and Freeport. The Freeport area became a serious rap proving ground. Sac pioneer Ace Mak (Ace Of Spades at the time) was a producer and influenced many of the household names you know of today. “Ace Mak taught me to make beats,” First Degree exclaims. Freeport groups like Black Rage (Ace, AK, and Marvaless) and The Wicked lead the new generation rap underground. The town had something special on the bubble, their own sound, their own buzz, their own chip.

 

Sacramento Rap History, Part Four

In the late 80’s, DC Ray was introduced to Cedric Singleton, a young strategist from Ohio, equally hungry for the game. “Ced Sing” was starting a new label with Robert Foster called Black Market Records. DC Ray and Black Market Records came together and released Black Market’s first single, DC Ray’s “What’s The Matter With Your Life?”. At this time, DC Ray was still the only Sac rapper in stores. Black Market and DC Ray’s relationship eventually got complicated and the two moved on. To this day, there are a few things DC Ray would like to hear Ced Sing say.

 

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Black Market’s first single was DC Ray’s “What’s The Matter With Your Life?”

During the recording of The Fahrenheit Hour, DC Ray states that he would like Ced to clean up the mess he made, admit some of his wrongs, and move forward. “I can see he is trying to make everything right now,” DC Ray defends. “But I could have signed with Atlantic Records!” He then goes on stating that Atlantic Records was interested in him. Atlantic was told DC Ray wasn’t interested. DC Ray suspects someone at Black Market told Atlantic that he wasn’t interested. “We could have done a better job with ‘What’s The Matter With Your Life’,” DC Ray also realizes out loud.

 

dc ray drawing on fahrenheit insight

 

By the early 1990’s, Black Market Records was preparing a take over, They released Homicide and was building their brand. It was then that a young Dalvin Pipkins (eventual owner of Death Trap Records) walked newbies X-Raided and Brotha Lynch Hung into the Black Market office. Also during this time, Bobby T and C-Bo, affiliates with Vallejo underground up-comers E-40 and The Click, were getting their situation together and had big plans of their own. Dalvin, Be Gee, First Degree The D.E., Young Joker, and Phonk Beta were on the verge of making history as well. Colossal things were on the horizon for these rap pioneers and the city of Sacramento.

The actions of these young trailblazers later started the Sacramento rap era you think you know. Do you really know? Find out on part two of “The History Of Sactown Rap”, here on Fahrenheit Insight!

You can hear this interview with DC Ray in its entirety soon on Fahrenheit Radio and Youtube.

 

First Degree The D.E.

Lynch & DE Cover Upload-2

“Fahrenheit Collectibles, Brotha Lynch Hung and First D.E.”
Out Now Digitally, In Stores November 18, 2014!

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United Nations 8.19.14

Oji 9.16.14

Phonk Beta 10.21.14

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 FahInsight.com

Meet Oji

381aaaf488f9003b957a53434c6a487c_imbsMeet Oji

By Jimmy Blog For Fahrenheit Insight

Q: So, where do we start Oji “The Gift Bearer”?

A: It all started for me with a self empowering initiation of what many call a “kundalini awakening”. When I was around 20yrs old, one day in my studio, while making a beat for a drug dealer from the old neighborhood. I was spontaneously rocking back and forth in the chair, breathing deeply. Suddenly, I felt the energy building up and I started shining. I could feel my cells opening in that moment. So then I asked the creator, what to do with all this energy within me. The answer it seems is too focus it like a laser beam into the future.
This experience allowed me too know another dimension of life. Which is very paranormal and “reality” altering without any drugs. Though it also alienated me because its hard to explain to folks if they have not experienced it. Its a freedom you reward yourself with. This supernatural energy is like an extra and inner terrestrial force.

Q: I see, very interesting. How did this experience effect the people around you?

A: Well as far as I could see sometimes people only love the fruit of a tree. Or they need more proof to take it serious. Though its the same yet different from the holy ghost. The rush of enlightenment could also be like a drug. Though I am addicted to God and that is where I found it. It strengthened my relationship too music as well.

Q: How long have you been making music?

A: I started back in 1987. With just a karaoke machine and then graduated to a four track to a digital recorder, then to computer. I wrote and recorded my first rap at my uncles studio when I was 12yrs old. His name is Mark Elliott. He also inspired me to be a producer because he’s a great r&b and funk hip hop producer, writer and dancer. He had a strutting dance group in the late 70’s called The “Close Encounters of The Funkiest Kind”.

Q: Alright, what other artist inspired you growing up?

A: The first record I bought was Run DMC Raising Hell, which helped mold my sound. Then I got into Michael Jackson, Stevie Wonder, Prince, the early Mac Dre, Too Short, N.W.A., J.T. The Bigga Figga and San Quin, R.B.L., E-40, Supa Nova Slom, C- Bo, Marveless, Dre Dog, Bone, Lynch, Sicx and Raided, The D.E., Bjork, Badu, Zap Mama, Tricky, Declaime, Georgia Anne Muldrow, D’Angelo, Marilyn Manson, Timbaland, etc.

Q: Wow, that is a primordial soup of influence.

A: That’s also including the music my mom introduced me too. Like Anita Baker,etc. I was also negatively influenced by music growing up. I was a huge fan of Lynch until I became a father. I grew up in Bayview Hunters Point in S.F. Where I was surrounded by violence and ignorance. Though I did get awarded artist in residence in a studio in an artist colony at the naval shipyard. That helped me learn that the art that I make, draw, paint, and sculpt have value to other people and made me take it more serious..

Q: Wow, you also do graphic arts?

A: Yes. I started drawing at a really young age. Now I consider myself a color and sound alchemist. I do it first to inspire others like other artist inspired me. I recently learned how to animate, so now I see how color and sound work together for the better.

Q: What would you do if you where not an artist?

A: If I where not an artist, I would be either a martial artist or quantum physicist.

Q: Quantum Physicist?

A: Yes. Although I feel I already am. Rhythm and tone are two simple places to start. Are bodies are advanced spiritual technology. Heart beat and voice was used by our ancestors to communicate too the Earth and universe. Especially the shamans who’s job is too see and feel the oneness. I am working on a documentary about my personal paranormal experiences with sound and color. Its called “Rhythmic Cognition Theory”.

Q: You also have an album coming out next October right?

A: Yessir! Its titled “Speak N’Tones” Which is about teaching children self empowering tones and vowels of the chakras, or healing overtones in an experimental and unconventional way. It features different artist that I collaborated with including my children, Mzee Divine, Luziluu from Germany, Royal Immortal from Brooklyn, and Amun Ra from Atlanta,etc. I did all of the production and mastering. Since our voice can be used as a weapon, it should also be used to heal and build with. There will also be a video game of the same name.

Q: Astounding! Do you sample too?

A: Yes, I started making beats by sampling. I’m very much a scientist when it comes too anything creative. So what ever I can get my hands on too record, I do. I have played and recorded live violin, piano, synth, tabla, finger harp, guitar, etc. H

Q: Where do you see yourself in the near future?

A: Healthy and wealthy! Hopefully in the near future I will be doing a whole lot more live performances, lots more production, lots more writing, art, animation, healing and building. Though I do feel like a time traveler. My future self is “converting black holes into stargates”. Quantumly speaking turning the negative in positive. Our cells become black holes that feed on negative energy if we are too stressed out. In a healthy state we shine and our cells are like stargates that keep an open communication to the creator.

Q: I see… What genre would you say categorized your sound?

A: Genre bending psychedelic hip hop. For fun I write in my own language. It feels like abstract painting. I would like to invent my own genre.

Q: Do you freestyle?

A: No. I grew up in freestyle cyphers, though whenever I try I speak in another language that feels ancestral. Its like an alter ego that was birthed out of anger, pain and self discovery. I know the most high comprehends and know I have the best intentions.

Q: Wow. What would be your dream collaboration?

A: It would be a dream come true for me too produce a song with Georgia Anne Muldrow and the D.E. on it together. Another goal I have is to produce a song with Bjork.

Q: That is something else. Is there anything else you would like too say?

A: I would like to thank you D.E. for this opportunity to show what I am artistically capable of.
I am on a mental treasure hunt, on the map of the brains maze…

 

Oi And The Ascension Team “Speak N Tones” Sept 2014

OJI COVER

Rare Interview With Phonk Beta of Fahrenheit & Madesicc

                  

Phonk Beta on T

Rare Interview With Phonk Beta

Interview by Jimmy Blog For Fahrenheit Insight

     Every once in a long while, an album comes out that defines a time, defines a city. Here in Sacramento, California,  that album was Brotha Lynch Hung’s “Loaded” album, an album so rich with time, talent, and soul, it will never be duplicated. This album, and many more, was produced by the legendary Phonk Beta. Phonk Beta recently connected with First Degree The D.E. on the Fahrenheit Hour Urban Talk Show to talk Loaded, Fahrenheit, Symplex, Brotha Lynch, Death Trap, his beginnings, purpose in music and much more.

“I can’t remember when I first touched the pianos, 3 or 4 maybe, and I’ve been lovin’ um ever since!” Beta clarifies. Phonk Beta was born in San Francisco. He has also lived in Sacramento and New York. He has produced on over 75 albums, put out 2 solos, and is known world-wide for his jazzy, dark soulful sound. He is the creator of the “Sacramento Siccness” sound.

The conversation with First Degree and Phonk Beta started with Beta’s jazz roots. First Degree inquires where Beta got his talents from and Beta explains that by emulating jazz greats like Miles Davis and Count Basie, he was able to create and perfect the sound known as Phonk Beta. “My first love is jazz, a lot of people don’t know that.” Beta also goes on to explain, “I used to always know how to touch the ivories, and Brotha Lynch taught me how to program drum beats.” Phonk Beta and Brotha Lynch became friends in high school in South Sacramento. They then teamed up to create one of the greatest rap albums of all time.

“I didn’t even know what we was doin back then,” Beta explains while talking about the creation of Loaded. His and First Degree detail how back then, beat making was a community event. First Degree then talks Planet Zero and tells that Brotha Lynch, Beta, and himself made the beat to Blackula together. First Degree also goes on to remind the people that Beta was the producer of the early Death Trap albums. Death Trap was Phonk Beta, First Degree, Be Gee, and Dalvin Pipkins.

D.E. and Beta’s long musical history is all on wax. “Phonk Beta has produced on every First Degree album from Southbound all the way to FU4!” First Degree The D.E. boasts.

While in conversation, First Degree The D.E. reveals to Beta, “the rap game is too easy for you know, no one’s doing anything that’s beyond anything you can do.”

“I kinda lost love for the music cuz of the Black Market,” Beta explains, “I’m getting the love back, I’m a lot better than I was back then.” The D.E. later includes that if the Brotha Lynch and Ced Sing (Black Market) relationship worked, Sacramento would have been a top 3 rap hub. Beta then goes on to gush about the Symplex series. Symplex, The Complex And Simple World Of Phonk Beta Jazz, is Phonk Beta’s jazz collection he puts out on Fahrenheit Records. The first Symplex album was received well by the rap audience, and was some fans first exposure to jazz music. The second edition comes out November 18, 2014. The third, which is already done, comes out 2015. The Symplex series promises to change the game!

“You’re the only one that can bring jazz to the rap world!” First Degree tells Beta. “The best thing about Symplex, is that you get credit for your genius.” D.E. paraphrases.

Besides the Symplex series, Phonk Beta is working on a compilation called “The Containment Unit” with Madesicc Musicc. Beta reports that this comp will be produced by him and have a bunch of upcoming Sacramento talent. Beta also explains that the Reloaded album is full speed ahead. At this point, le Phonkster is the only human on Earth that can make that happen.

When asked about his legacy, Beta states, “I want to leave something for my future family, I’m teaching my son how to makes beats.” For the love of the rap game, let’s hope he learns!

On a personal note, Phonk Beta has been torn between the Brotha Lynch  and First Degree beef. Over the past year, Brotha Lynch and First Degree have had a very public altercation that thousands of fans have chimed in on. “Let’s get the record straight,” explains First Degree The D.E., “I’ve been working with Phonk Beta before anyone ever heard of a Brotha Lynch!” Although Beta had nothing to do with the beef with Lynch and D.E., his name has been flying around it’s discussions. Within the storm, Phonk Beta has been a calming, neutral force that all parties respect. Because of his affiliation with Lynch and D.E., he has taken beef from friends and fans, but to Beta’s credit, he stays even keel and will eventually be the glue that ties everything back together.

You can hear this interview in its entirety on Fahrenheit Hour on Fahrenheit Radio. You can check it out on demand on Youtube by searching “Fahrenheit Hour 23”. Symplex 2 comes out November 18, 2014. Phonk Beta beats for sale can be heard at http://www.reverbnation.com/phonkbeta. Phonk Beta also has a hot T shirt line he has started. Get up on Shlangz!

 

Phonk Beta “Symplex 2” Nov 18, 14

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Symplex 1 out now!