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tech n9ne is trying to steal brotha lynch's wife art

Tech N9ne and Brotha Lynch

tech n9ne is trying to steal brother lynchs wifeTech N9ne Is Trying To Steal Brotha Lynch’s Wife

By Jimmy Blog Of The Fahrenheit Record

During First Degree The D.E.’s visit on UGS Radio, Brotha Lynch claims Tech N9ne is after his wife.

On April 14th, 2016, First Degree The D.E. was on The Murder Master Music Show and delivered many surprises, including bringing Brotha Lynch into fray. During the hour and a half long interview, First Degree The D.E. discussed his new album “Black Bane, The Misunderstood Hero”, it’s purpose, it’s musical production, the racial epithets he occasionally uses in songs, being banned from Strange Music, his recently earned Master’s Degree, and much more.

It was near the end of the episode when things took a turn.

About twenty minutes into the episode, First Degree The D.E. surprised hosts Prez B, Mac, and the MMMS audience by having the one and only Brotha Lynch Hung call in. They talked about the two’s relationship, which seems to be mended now, Lynch’s new EP “Bullet Maker”, and to everyone’s surprise, the accusation that Tech N9ne is trying to steal Brotha Lynch’s wife. Lynch asserts on the show, “He won’t stop ’til he gets my wife!” He didn’t go into detail, instead went on detailing his appreciation for Strange Music.

During the interview, Brotha Lynch reflected on his time at Strange Music. Lynch’s latest release, “Bullet Maker”, was released on Lynch’s own label, Madesicc Music. It is unclear if Brotha Lynch’s next full album, “Kevlar”, will be released by Strange Music. Observers of Brotha Lynch and Tech N9ne have noted a unique bond between the two, filled with deep admiration and power riffs.

“During Brotha Lynch’s time with Strange Music, he and Tech N9ne had an interesting relationship. Tech grew up on Lynch, yet Tech owns the label Lynch is now on and has a vast audience of his own now. On the flip side, Lynch is a proud MC with a vast, devoted following, and past label troubles that haunt him to this day” First Degree explains to The Fahrenheit Record. First Degree served as Brotha Lynch’s manager during the Brotha Lynch/Strange Music merger. He includes, “there’s definitely a weird element between Lynch, his wife Lauren, and Tech goin on.” Could Tech N9ne be trying to steal Brotha Lynch’s wife for sport?

In one of Tech N9ne’s singles, “Mental Giant”, Tech N9ne raps that he’s, “narcissistic, dark and wicked”. Was the result of the mix of an MC with an ego, and a proud MC bringing it back, toxic, or historical? The debate will be waged for years, yet only time will tell.

In addition to Tech N9ne Brotha Lynch controversy, First Degree and Lynch gave the audience an inside look into the album making process.

When it came to defining the Black Bane concept, First Degree The D.E. explained that the Black Bane character is a hero for the people. He aimed to inspire and inform, with the type of music that changes the game. He has just completed his Master’s degree in global teaching strategies and was ready to get back into the studio. First Degree’s baritone rap and singing style is unique, truthful and remains cutting edge. He explains that for the music, he relied on Phonk Beta, with guest production by Oji El, Eric Otis, Sultan Mir. “Live piano, live guitar, and inspiration” The D.E. reveals. On the album’s first single, the title track “Black Bane”, First Degree challenges the listener to stand up and fight for somebody. Black Bane is very well put together and has a new, fresh vibe that spews of talent, musical innovation, and time. Prez B of UGS calls Black Bane First Degree’s best album to date. His review can be read HERE.

First Degree went on to address some of the controversy surrounding lyrics on his new “Black Bane” album. Some have taken offense to racial epithets used in his songs. For example, during the interview, host Scott Bejda played “Say Serra” from Black Bane. It included the lines, “(I) gots, the kind of Jews, you can’t refuse. The kind of Japs thats peel ‘yo caps. The kind of spooks, thats put up dukes. The kind of crackas, thats serious backas. The kind of Messicans, thats spill ‘yo ‘intesskins’. The kind of Mooslims, thats make ‘ya dooslims,. The kind of Flips thats flips they whips.” On The Murder Master Music Show, and later with The Fahrenheit Record, The D.E. provides insight into the use of these terms.tech n9ne is trying to steal brotha lynchs wife first degree

First Degree The D.E. uses words like “crackas” and “Moooslims” to bring attention to his message about race

“Ironically, the same people that are sensitive to my use of these words, are the same people that need to hear it,” First Degree The D.E. explains. He also discloses that he represents the underground people, he uses the racial epithets to get peoples attention on the topic, inform, and is sometimes joking. “I get tired on the N-word in songs, and folks repeatin it when they shouldn’t be,” includes The D.E.

The 20 year rap veteran also justifies his lyric, “Can’t give a white bum money, shoulda cashed in on ya privlege, ya dummy!”. This line appears on his latest video, “I Wear Black Cuz Its Just My Style”. First Degree points out that he has in fact given white homeless people money, and hints that the line’s purpose was shed light on white privilege. In the past, First Degree has stirred up racial controversy for his single, “Listen Up, Ya Honkey” from his Super Black album.

“I couldn’t believe he did that,” reveals Brotha Lynch during the interview.

Brotha Lynch Hung was very open during this rare interview he participated in as well. The 27 year rap veteran also updated us on rumors in the Sacramento rap game, including his health, legal troubles, and X Raided’s release. Lynch explained that he was in the hospital last year, and had recovered. He stated that he had gotten so sick that, “my wife said I was walking around with my pants down”. He also talked about recently getting off of probation for nine months and going sober during that time. Now off probation, on the show he proclaimed that he was “real high”. In regards to the rumors that X Raided had been released in prison, Lynch explained the X Raided did not get released, yet has a parole hearing in 120 days. Popular rap news website Sacramentorap.com is normally the first to have the scoop on these type issues. Brotha Lynch also frequently talked about his wife Lauren from her “beatin up every bitch in Sac”, to her cooking.

Brotha Lynch and First Degree had real good things to say about each other. They talked about stimulating each other, their friendship outside the studio, and finding it important to have each other’s input on projects. The two have been making music together for over 20 years, most famously on Lynch’s “Loaded” and First Degree’s “Planet Zero”. In addition, Brotha Lynch hinted at the making of a group album with First Degree, and Phonk Beta, and himself. “Im hopin’ that me and D.E. can put an album together. It’ll be epic because all the classic stuff we’ve done. Fans on my Instagram all day like ‘when you gunna work with D.E. again?'”

A key factor in First Degree and Brotha Lynch working again is his current ban from Strange Music. As a result of juggalo backlash, First Degree The D.E. had been banned from Strange Music’s website and location. On the MMMS, The D.E. stated that he and Strange Music are peers and they should go back to working together. “Strange Music, un-ban me from ya facilities!” proposes First Degree The D.E.

From the “historic” 258th episde of UGS’s Murder Master Music Show, it is obvious that good things are here and to come from Brotha Lynch Hung, First Degree The D.E., and Sacramento rap’s future.

To hear insight into the Brotha Lynch and First Degree, Fahrenheit Radio, and an open discussion on Tech N9ne and Strange Music, click the link for Episode 258 of the Murder Master Music Show HERE.

tech n9ne trying to steal brotha lynchs wife bullet maker

Brotha Lynch Hung “Bullet Maker, and First Degree The D.E. “Black Bane” are available digitally and in retail stores now.

tech n9ne is trying to steal brotha lynch's wife first degree Black Bane Cover

Brotha Lhynch Bullet Maker Reivew by First Degree The DE and Soupbone

Brotha Lynch Bullet Maker Brings Back The Sacramento Siccness

 

brotha lynch bullet maker

Brotha Lynch Bullet Maker Brings Back The Sacramento Siccness

By Jimmy Blog For The Fahrenheit Record

    Brotha Lynch Hung is at it again, this time back on his Madesicc label with “Bullet Maker EP”. After 25+ years in the recording industry, the question is will this album further his legacy, or demoish it?

After a private screening of the album, Fahrenheit Records recording artists First Degree The D.E. and Soupbone seem to think that Brotha Lynch’s legacy will take a step forward with this latest release. To make public their feelings on Brotha Lynch Bullet Maker  and the role the albums plays in Lynch’s legacy, the two underground rap pioneers put together a creative review of the album, now availible on Youtube HERE.

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Fahrenheit Records’ recording artist “Soubone”

    In the beginning of the reivew, questions arise like, “Does Lynch die?” and “Is Lynch alive?”. First Degree The D.E. and Soupbone go on about the definition of being alive, debate if Brotha Lynch has a soul, and the purpose of Sacramento rap music.

Once discussing album specifics, The D.E. and Soup provide more detail about Brotha Lynch Bullet Maker and what makes Brotha Lynch Hung special. Soup explains, “He has an ability to sit there and just really just take you away from your current curcumstances and just be free, where you can just let all your anger and rage go with no consequecnces, no consequecnces.” Lynch’s appeal couldn’t be summed up any better.

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“Selfie” of First Dergee, Phonk Beta, and Brotha Lynch during a private screening of Brotha Lynch Bullet Maker

    The Brotha Lynch Bullet Maker review, posted on First Degree’s Youtube page, is unique because it comes from the perspective of two men that listen to his music, are part of the Sacramento rap legacy, and that know Lynch personally. The D.E. and Soup’s personal knowledge of Brotha Lynch brings this glowing endorsement to life. “My rilla done been through so much!” states First Degree in the review.

In this review, First Degree explains that the new Brotha Lynch Bullet Maker EP had the kind of sound that made him proud to be a Sacramentian. “The kind of slaps thats claps yo blaps”, he explains.

Brotha Lynch Bullet Maker is a digital only Madesicc Musicc release, scheduled for a Feb 19th street date. Check out the audio of the  review in its entirety on Youtube HERE.

First Degree Black Bane 2

Black Bane Puts Eminem, Tech N9ne, and Brotha Lynch On Notice In New Video

Black Bane Puts Eminem, Tech N9ne, and Brotha Lynch On Notice With New Video

DE SF 2

First Degree The D.E. takes on the Black Bane persona and looks to raise the thought, talent, and purpose in today’s rap music

By Fahrenheit Insight’s Jimmy Blog

   Just when America needs answers, The D.E. provides. In a quest to bolster hip hop consciousness, Sacramento rapper First Degree The D.E. calls out rap heavy weights Eminem, Tech N9ne, and Brotha Lynch in new video, “Black Bane”, which can be seen HERE.

   First Degree The D.E. is a world renowned entertainer/activist and pioneer of Sacramento rap, has performed over 100 shows across the USA, and  is responsible for 55 projects in all. In addition to his uplifting message in the recording booth, First Degree is an active participant in South Sacramento community. The label he owns, Fahrenheit Records, had sold over 80,000 units world-wide , consists of artists stretching the West Coast,  and enjoys a 20 years history of quality, thoughtful, diverse music. Fahrenheit Records operates an award winning, world-wide online radio station called Fahrenheit Radio, and owns and operates 14 websites, including FirstDegreeTheDE.com, Sacramentorap.com, Californiarap.com, and USrapnews.com.

    The Fahrenheit Insight caught up with First Degree during the “I Wear Black Cuz Its Just My Style” video shoot at the 49er’s stadium in Santa Clara, CA. It was a cloudy evening with thousands of raucous, optimistic fans tailgating in the Levi Stadium paring lot for Monday Night Football’s opening of the 2015 season. The D.E.  gave us insight into the history and purpose behind Black Bane, and what it means to be a street vigilante. Who is First Degree Black Bane?

First Degree black bane 3First Degree The D.E. defines conscious lyricism with Fahrenheit’s 55 project, Black Bane The Misunderstood Genius Part 1

   Over his 20 year rap history, First Degree has put on many masks to deliver his message. This includes RoboDE, Blackulem, Shlumpulicious, and Super Black to name a few. Being Fahrenheit Records’ 55th project, the first thing The Fahrenheit Insight wanted to know about Black Bane was what the difference between it all the past First Degree characters.

   “The more things change, the more they stay the same,” First Degree explains. “Like the other recent characters I’ve portrayed on albums, I was told by the universe to take on this persona. I don’t just sit around and decide, ‘I’m gunna do this, or I’m gunna say that.’ God an His universe instructs me to do so, and I oblige.” He then went on to lay out the purpose of Black Bane.

   First Degree The D.E. went all out to detail the characteristics of Black Bane. He explained tat unlike the other characters he’s portrayed, Black Bane sees the world as a grey area, meaning there’s no definitive good or bad, just perspective. “Black Bane is a street vigilante. Once he’s locked onto a goal that’s just, he affiliates with the good and the bad in order to fulfill that purpose. He’s purpose is just, his means are questionable to some.”

Phonk Beta Black Bane

Long time Brotha Lynch producer Phonk Beta goes all the way live with his production on First Degree Black Bane

   When asked about Black Bane’s purpose and goals, First Degree related Black Bane’s vision of a fair society in which opportunities flow equally across all social and economic levels, the people are informed and inspired, and doing his part to help shed the effects of Jim Crow and return the people to the regalness that is within them. “This is what he calls fighting for the people. Black Bane just takes aggressive means and plays the role only he can play, in order to get the job did,” First Degree The D.E. asserts. He concludes, “To deliver this message, I relied on the Great Phonk Beta and challenged him to remind the people what makes him great, and he succeeded with an unbelievable array of superior, live shlumpage.”

When we got in the lab we asked ourselves how we can make this one bigger and better. We achieved that goal with thought, soul, effort, talent, time, patience, and purpose.

The Fahrenheit Record was given a copy of the First Degree Black Bane singles in preparation of this article. They include “Black Bane”, “I Wear Black Cuz Its Just My Style”, and “Say Serra”.

First Degree Black Bane Annimated Face Oji

First Degree Black Bane through the eyes of Oji

Black Bane

The first single is the title track, Black Bane. It starts with First Degree and The Celebration (his kids), telling the story of Black Bane to a dark, aggressive, piano driven, Phonk Beta beat. The first line, “The cost to be boss, atroc-it-ties, that most can’t handle, that’s that’s why you boss, that’s why you bump my blamble, that and rap scandal” provides immediate insight into the mind of Black Bane. The chorus is a daunting 8 bars of dark singing, thunder, and whipping. Black Bane’s lyrics are hard, political, and thoughtful, “Not affected by ISIS, that’s way far, the man’s cookin books here, that’s on our radar.”

The First Degree Black Bane video is another genius animation from Fahrenheit’s Oji, filled with good guys, bad guys, and all in between. The ultra creative video details the many faces and duties of Black Bane and his allies. In addition, the video includes Eminem, Tech N9ne, and Brotha Lynch. When asked why they were included in the video, First Degree explains, “Oji and I saw this video as an opportunity to remind rap’s division leaders to have purpose in their music, before its too late. I’m in cahoots with Lynch as we speak, collaborating on Strange Music’s ‘Kevlar’ album, and that ‘Black Bane Part 2, The Underestimated Villan'”. The D.E. asserts, “its time for the Brotha Lynchs, the Phonk Betas, and the First Degrees to get back together in unison and continue this legacy we’ve created.” He finishes his thought by including that Brotha Lynch was on his way back from Kansas City laying vocals for Strange Music’s Strangulation 2 album, and would will be back at work the Sactown vet as soon as he gets back.

In this single, First Degree raps, “(I’m) banned from Strange Music Inc.” When asked to elaborate, The D.E. declined, citing that it wasn’t the time and a desire to move forward. Why did he put the line in the song, The Fahrenheit Insight wonders.

First Degree Black Bane 2

NFL Network films part of the First Degree The D.E. “I Wear Black Cuz Its Just My Style” video shoot, 49er Stadium with Empire Row

I Wear Black Cuz Its Just My Style

The second single from the Black Bane album is a dedication to West Coast 90’s rap pioneers and the influence it had on world-wide American culture. ‘I Wear Black Cuz Its Just My Style’ is a 90’s style Beta beat with live pianos and live guitar played by L.A.’s Eric Otis. The sound is a nice, unique mix between old school west coast sampling, a live Curtis funk band, and the Straight Outta Cmopton movie. The song’s title and theme came from a 90’s rap group consisting of The D.E.’s good friend Big Ron and Live Wire from the L.A. area.

The “Wear Black’ video was being shot at 49ers Levi Stadium in Santa Clara, California the day of this interview. An official 49er’s tailgating pep rally, thrown by Arevalo Production’s Empire Row, served as the back drop. It was a nationally televised Monday Night Football game and the unveiling of the 49ers’ new black uniforms. It was a wild event, filled with Fahrenheit fans and 49er faithfuls alike. The scene is sure to jump off the camera as soon as the video is completed and released.

First Degree black bane 5First Degree utilizes green screen for the first time in Say Serra

Say Serra

The third Black Bane video is the most musical, lyrical, and entertaining of the bunch.” Say Serra” is a finely-crafted First Degree hit with its own sound and racially controversial lyrics that will have the streets buzzing for some time to come. This single has a hard, groovy, big production, live sound that has never and will never be duplicated. Once again, Phonk Beta is on the beat and live pianos, and Eric Otis is on the live Spanish guitar.

The Say Serra video is all D.E.. First Degree gets close up, entertains, dances, and delivers his unique brand of poetry, “That video’s gunna be up close and personal to leave no doubt what I’m sayin!” Oh boy.

When asked how one picks singles for the album, First Degree reiterates that he is a vessel of the universe and does what it instructs him to do. He also points out that local publication Sacramento News and Review leaked and reviewed one of the songs, ‘The Fahrenheit Record’, HERE. The article included reporter Raheem Hosseini’s funny individual experience with the informative song. The Fahrenheit Record mentions many Sacramento area reporters, and several of them, including the KCRA’s Edie Lambert, Kevin Riggs, and Sacramento Bee’s Chris Macias started the buzz by posting about the song on their Facebook pages.

d'angelo black messiah first degree black bane 8

D’Angelo Black Messiah played a roll in developing First Degree Black Bane

   When asked about what, if any, outside musician provided influence for Black Bane, First Degree bared a big grin and explained that the D’Angelo Black Messiah album was the first album in ten years that stimulated his mind. “D’Angelo is the greatest singing and producing entity of all time. I have never heard such funky, sticky, risky, smooth, forward thinking, live music ever. Michael Jackson is the best dancer ever, Phonk Beta is the best rap producer ever, and D’Angelo is the greatest singer/producer of all time, fa sho. I’ve listened to that album 100 times already.” First Degree goes on to justify that D’Angelos latest album Black Messiah is “gleaming with purpose” and “stimulates those that understand”. The D.E. states that Black Messiah is the reason he reached out to Phonk Beta and Eric Otis for live instrumentation.

First Degree also sites the current urban struggle, and a second meeting with hip hop legend Rakim that had influence on his new direction.

If the people take to the Black Bane album like the listeners that this reporter has witnessed, the West Coast rap game will have a new bar to try to live to.

First Degree Black Bane hits stores world-wide October 20, 2015. Live First Degree Black Bane performances will take place in the Seattle and Denver areas in December of 2015, with more locations to be announced. The album is produced by Phonk Beta, with additional production by Oji and Sultan Mir. Fahrenheit Records is distributed by City Hall Records and The Orchard.

More information can be found at FirstDegreeTheDE.com

Black Bane Cover

Fahrenheit Records’ 55th album, First Degree The D.E. “Black Bane” brings purpose to the underground rap game and hits stores October 20, 2015

french rap Ghost1

First Degree The D.E. & Fahrenheit Influence French Rap

french rap Ghost DEST

First Degree The D.E. And The Fahrenheit Movement Influence French Rap

The Fahrenheit Insight interviews France’s Ghost D.E.S.T. about First Degree The D.E. and Fahrenheit’s influence on the region

As a result of his 20+ years in rap music, First Degree The D.E. has influenced rap music on a global scale.

As an artist, Sacramento rap veteran First Degree The D.E. has reached a world-wide audience. His 40+  albums and his work with Brotha Lynch Hung, Andre Nickatina, and Tech N9ne, has exposed his unique talents to the world. The Fahrenheit Movement has touched the world as well.

France has one of the worlds fastest growing hip hop scenes. For the past 15 years or so, French musicians have taken American rap, inserted their culture, and created a new sound. The French hip hop sound is gritty, reminiscent of late 90’s American rap music. As a result of being around since the mid 90’s, First Degree The D.E. and The Fahrenheit Movement are influential in French rap, and French rappers.

One of the early French rap organizations was Dez Jakk’s War N Peace crew.  Dez Jakk and the gang have been putting out music since the early 2000’s and have had First Degree The D.E., and Sacramento’s E-Moe, featured on a past album called “The French Connection”.  After War N Peace’s 2010 “Inhale The Peace”,
Dez Jakk stopped making music because of his own religion convictions. The War N Peace crew was then on their own.

french rap Ghost D.E.S.T.

French Rapper Ghost D.E.S.T.

A standout member of the War N Peace corps is Ghost D.E.S.T. Ghost D.E.S.T. is 29, and was born in Roubaix “the poorest city in France”. He and his family have since moved to Switzerland. His lyrics are based on political corruption, geopolitical problems, wars, poverty in the world, the state of hip hop, the fact that weed is not legalize in France.  Ghost’s “I Am Hip Hop” drops in 2015.

Ghost D.E.S.T. proclaims First Degree The D.E. to be his favorite rapper. Ghost has all 40+ First Degree albums and has followed the Fahrenheit Shlangz for over a decade. He states, “We represent the Fahrenheit Movement here in France and Switzerland. We’re waiting for a First Degree The D.E. ‘s European Tour. French people need it!”

First Degree The D.E. hit the French rap scene hard with appearances on Brotha Lynch Hung’s 1997 “Loaded” album. The French hip hop community then experienced “The Big Black Bat” and “Planet Zero”. It was then that many  of the French underground, including Ghost D.E.S.T.,  officially became true First Degree fans.

D.E.S.T. explains he and his community loves Fahrenheit music because of it’s uniqueness. He further justifies, “Nobody does music like First Degree The D.E. How many artist can rap, sing, and make dope instrumentals? It’s much more than music to me, D.E.‘s lyrics are food for thoughts and Fahrenheit music taught me how to be a SUPER ME! My dad and my uncles are true Fahrenheit Shlangaz too! Much respect to artists like Be Gee, Soupbone, E-Moe, D-Dubb and Phonk Beta. R.I.P. P-Folks!”

When asked what makes Fahrenheit and Sacramento rap stand out, he reveals, “I like Sacramento artists like First Degree The D.E. because the music is much more different than all the other West Coast artist. I think that Sac Town artists, especially Fahrenheit music, has a special vibe. The lyric contents are so different. They are deeper and contain a lots of concepts, stories and characters (The Big Black Bat, Shlumpulicious The Jester, Robo D.E.) . This is a unique kind of rap and the mission is to bring back real rap music to hip hop addicts’ ears.

Ghost later includes, “The fact that The Fahrenheit Movement is an underground and urban movement is important to my eyes because that makes me feel like it’s all about the message and not about all the rap cliché. The purpose is to open your mind to another way of thinking, a higher level, another way to live your life, to interact with people. We all can be a part of the solution, but we need to have true leaders, and D.E. his one of mine.”

For those new to The Fahrenheit Movement, Ghost D.E.S.T. recommends First Degree The D.E. classic songs like “Link In The Chain”, “Open Wide”,  “Watchin’ My Life Go”, “You’ve Gone And Did It”,  “You Ain’t F*&# Wit My Time”, and “Bang!”. The Fahrenheit music and purpose can be sampled on Fahrenheit Radio, available at FahRadio.com, iTunes Radio, Windows Radio, and Tune In. Many First Degree videos are on Youtube as well.

With a mix of consistency, good music, purpose, and conscious lyrics, First Degree The D.E. and The Fahrenheit Movement has become a major factor in French rap and global rap music.

An Interview by Jimmy Blog of The Fahrenheit Insight

FahInsight.com

brotha lynch hung first degre beef fahrenheit collectibles

Brotha Lynch Hung & First Degree The D.E.

“Fahrenheit Collectibles”

OUT NOW!

sacramento rap HISTORY 2

The History Of Sacramento Rap (Part Two, The Rise)

sacramento rap HISTORY 2

The History Of Sacramento Rap (Part Two, The Rise)

Written by First Degree The D.E. and Jimmy Blog For Fahrenheit Insight

Note: Sacramento rap history. Before writing part two of this series, The Fahrenheit Insight sat down with Black Market Records’ owner Cedric Singleton after his appearance on Fahrenheit Radio’s Fahrenheit Hour Urban Talk Show. This was to discover the truth about the peak of the Sacramento Rap Game.

Sacramento Rap History, Part Five

Picture it, its 1992, and Northern California rap music was on the rise. Sacramento had it’s underground hip-hop king, DC Ray, but who would be prince?

Cedric Singleton, a young producer from Ohio, had come to Sacramento State University to play basketball. He ended up staying in Sac and setting up shop as a music manager and producer. He was hungry for the rap game, and had help. He started Black Market Records, put out Oak Park’s Homicide, and his vision was official. Through parties and the music scene, he met a young Brotha Lynch Hung and X-Raided. He heard their talent and decided to go all in. Little did he know the crazy stories he’d be a part of. Little did he know the impact he and his Black Market Records crew would have on our region, and the world.

black markets homiicide knockin off weak cs fahreneit insight

Homicide’s “Knockin’ Off All Weak MCs” was Black Market’s first album

By this time, Sactown rap crews, with their own sound and serious heat, carved up rap battles all throughout the region. Bloods and Crip gangs were infiltrating Sacramento streets as well. Northern California rap had become the hottest underground rap hub in the world. Northern rap pioneers E-40 and The Click, produced by Mike Mosely and Sam Bostic, had the nation appreciating the unique, Northern California hip hop culture. Street crews like The Garden Blocc’s Brotha Lynch Hung and C-Bo, Meadowview’s Be Gee, Rup Dog, and AK47, Greenhaven’s First Degree The D.E., Crucial Point and DJ Urban Thesis (MC King at the time), and Freeport’s Ace Mak (Ace Of Spades at the time) and Ms. Marvaless ran the underground through the battle rap circuit.

Sacramento’s rap sound was hard, dark, and reality based. Music producers like Phonk Beta, Mike Mosely, Sam Bostic, Ace Mak, Brotha Lynch, and First Degree The D.E. created the musical sound. It was a quality, rich sound that many had a part of. It was a sound that made Sacramento stand out.

Black Market Records owner Cedric Singleton explains on a recent episode of The Fahrenheit Hour that although everyone ended up in different crews, on different labels, everyone felt connected. In the beginning, all of the pioneers participating in the Sacramento music game were a family, working together.

 

Sacramento Rap History, Part Six

After meeting X-Raided at a DJ party and hearing his “Psycho Active”, Cedric knew he had a hit on his hands. On Fahrenheit Radio’s Fahrenheit Hour, “Ced Sing” as Cedric Singleton is called, remembers just finishing the X-Raided when, “I had heard about something that happened about a mile and a half away form my house.” It was the murder of Patricia Harris.

Ced then states that X-Raided came to his house and said, “Im gunna have to get outta town, something happened.” They officially signed contracts, then he was gone.

A few days later on the news, Ced heard that police in Arizona had caught someone wanted for murder in Sacramento. That’s where X-Raided had told him he was going. When Ced Sing put two and two together, he was shocked. The artist he had just signed was arrested for murder. It wasn’t the last time Ced Sing would be shocked by one of his artists.

“The media took off with it, connecting some of X’s lyrics to the killing,” summons Mr. Singleton. Although Ced owned the album, he still had reservations about putting it out. “I was conflicted about it, so I went to the house were she (Patricia Harris) got killed and I went to see Mr. Harris (husband of Patricia Harris). He told me to put out the record, siting that freedom of speech was more important than anything I can tell you.” Strong words, from a strong man, at a trying time.

x raided Psycho-Active fahrenheit insight

X-Raided’s “Psycho Active” was a controversial album due to the artist’s alleged participation of Meadowview’s Patricia Harris

“After that, there was nuthin’ anyone could say to me about puttin’ the record out!” exclaimed Cedric Singleton on Fahrenheit Hour. The sound of his voice had stress and experience in it. It was obvious that there was a lot of controversy he experienced with putting out the X-Raided albums. However, getting the blessing from the victim’s husband put his mind somewhat at peace.

Black Market continued to drop X-Raided albums from prison. X-Raided would get a recording device smuggled inside prison, the inmates would keep voices down, and they made hits.

Outside of Sacramento’s borders, X-Raided is a jailed hero. “Free X-Raided”, fans say. However often, the public only hears one side of a story. Within Sacramento’s borders, it is much different story. X-Raided is a controversial figure. Some love him because of his flow, Sacramento rap pioneering, and hard core reputation. Some hate him because of the woman he and his friends were convicted of killing. The woman killed in the home invasion was Patricia Harris, a kind, innocent, Meadowview grandmother.

brotha lynch 24 deep fahrenheit insight

With Black Market’s push, and a cutting edge flow, Brotha Lynch Hung’s “24 Deep” shocked the country

Sacramento Rap History, Part Seven

“He came to me with 24 Deep before we even had a contract,” Cedric Singleton reflects on Brotha Lynch on Fahrenheit Radio’s Fahrenheit Hour.

By this time, it was 1993. Black Market was a well oiled machine. Ced remembers the promotion trail, hitting 22 cities, promoting the Black Market/Sacramento rap movement. “It wasn’t work, it was fun,” describes Ced. Ced Sing and the Black Market crew were traveling the country, getting people on what was going on in Sacramento. Black Market had a serious presence on the road because of the road work they did. First Degree recalls Andre Nickatina once saying, “It was like 94, I was in Pennsylvania. I went to the record store and there was a giant display of Brotha Lynch right in the front!”

“I can remember being at Dr.Dre’s ‘Up In Smoke Tour’ in San Jose. While promoting, I noticed Black Market had 30 people in the front, picketing Brotha Lynch!” reflects First Degree The D.E. on Fahrenheit Radio’s Fahrenheit Hour. Ced then goes on to say they hit the whole tour, all 44 dates across the country. Wow.

All of the grass roots leg work paid off. Black Market dropped Brotha Lynch’s “24 Deep”. It was the first Sacramento rap album to hit the Billboard charts. It debuted at #87. This was a big deal. The combination of Brotha Lynch’s raw talent, sampled beats, and an album cover with him in a casket, made it easy for Ced Sing to promote. “Its all about the artists’ talent, a label can only lead you to the water,” Ced clarifies.

“I can remember going into Black Market back in the day, and everybody was working!” exclaims First Degree The D.E. on Fahrenheit Hour.

The success of Black Market inspired others. It let them know they could do it, too. Black Market’s success lead to the creation of other Sacramento rap labels. The main two labels spawned by Black Market’s success were AWOL Records and Death Trap Records.

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C-Bo’s “Gas Chamber” was AWOL’s first big release

Sacramento Rap History, Part Eight

AWOL Records was owned by Freddie T Smith. Freddy and Cedric Singleton were friends. “To this day, Freddie is like a little brother,” reveals Ced Sing. Their artists included C-Bo, Ms. Marvaless, Pizzo, and Lunisicc. Freddie and AWOL Records followed the same blue print as Black Market; grass roots, taking it to the people in their city. Bobby Grey was also a big part of AWOL’s success. He died at a young age from a heart attack. Despite the loss, AWOL was a very successful record label.

“AWOL was able to put out three, four, five C-Bo albums, it was a consistent machinery that was building both the artist and the label.” Ced explains. When speaking on Freddy Smith, Mr. Singleton elaborates, “There was never any animosity, jealously or anything like that. A couple times Freddy went to jail he would call me, and I would do what I could to help him in whatever the situation that he needed.” Black Market and AWOL weren’t competitors, they were an alliance. An alliance with the purpose to nationally represent the Northern California region, and make money doing it. C-Bo’s peak was an appearance on 2Pac’s “All Eyes On Me”, released by Death Row Records. AWOL’s baby brother in the Sactown music game was Death Trap Records.

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Death Trap Records’ Be Gee, First Degree The D.E., and owner Dalvin Pipkins at #Be40

Death Trap Records was owned by youngster Dalvin Pipkins. During Be Gee’s recent “Be40” event, Dalvin explained to Fahrenheit Insight that City Hall Records’ Walter Zelnick once called Dalvin, “the youngest in the game.” Dalvin started Death Trap Records at age 22. The Death Trap stable included Be Gee, First Degree The D.E., Phonk Beta, Young Joker, and many more. “Being part of the Death Trap crew, making hits in Davlin’s garage, was a good, pivotal period in time,” comments First Degree The D.E.

“I remember Dalvin and Death Trap. Dalvin was just a cool guy. I never looked at him as competition.” analyzes Ced Sing. This goes back to the mood that all the labels were working together for the sake of their own label, and the city. “My thinking was more like that, if we are able to elevate this region, its better for everybody,” wisely explained Ced Sing. “We were doing interviews with The Source, why?! Because people were curious on what was going on in Sacramento.”

 

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Be Gee’s “Ya Gotta Be Gee”, released by Death Trap Records in 1993, is arguably the best rap album to drop out of Sacramento 

However, “Of the labels, Black Market was the most organized. top to bottom,” Ced Sing admits.

Ced sites that the unity was one of the main reasons it was all working. “Following the same stream, you know who your fans are. Theres a familiarity with that old school machinery.”

Sacramento Rap History, Part Nine

Eventually, all of the street buzz Black Market created got the attention of major labels, including Priority Records. Other Sacramento artists, like R&B artists D.R.S. (Dirty Rotten Scoundrels) and hip hop’s Funky Socialistics had made a name for themselves as well. Black Market had been distributing many successful albums, including Master P’s first group album, “TRU”. “Master P wouldn’t sleep for three, four, five days,” remembers Ced Sing, siting Master P’s motor and mind.

Hundreds of thousands of dollars were flying around by this time. The majors, particularly Priority Records, desperately wanted in.

Once the Northern California rap game blew up, the majors wanted a piece of the action. Priority had a strategy, sign all of these Northern California labels to label deals, taking over the competitors. Current Strange Music Vice President David Weiner was working at Priority Records at the time. He is the one responsible for bringing Black Market to Priority Records. It was a game changing event. Sacramento music had hit the national scale. Their first album together was Brotha Lynch Hung’s “Season Of The Siccness”, a raw, horrorcore, gang-banging tour through the streets of South Sacramento. It had a mild sales start, however, it was extremely consistent, selling 5,000 copies a week for several years! Once again, the combination of Lynch’s shocking, real life, meticulous, sick flow, combined with Black Market’s work, was making history. This time on a national level. “Season” hit #26 on the Billboard charts. Season Of The Siccness has since gone platinum, one million units sold.

David Weiner and Priority Records then went to sign J.T. The Bigga Figga of Get Low Records, and Master P of No Limit Records to lucrative label deals, ranging from (tune in to Fahrenheit Hour for numbers!). These deals paved the way by Black Market’s more humble deal.

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Brotha Lynch Hung’s “Season Of The Siccness” has gone platinum

During this time, C-Bo and AWOL Records had also reached a national audience. The AWOL sound was hard core , produced by E-40 producer, Mike Mosely. C-Bo, Ms. Marvaless, and Lunisicc were doing the rap game big, 100%. It was fun to watch both Black Market and AWOL Records try to out do each other. It was more like brotherly encouragement, then competition.

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First Degree The D.E.’s “Southbound” (cassette version) continued the Death Trap history of hits

Death Trap Records was in full swing as well. Although Death Trap didn’t have the notoriety on Black Market and AWOL, they were gaining ground in the West coast underground. The first Death Trap release was Be Gee’s “Ya Gotta Be Gee (1993)”. Be Gee was one of the champion of the Kennedy rap battle circuit. With Phonk Beta playing live keys, the sound was classic, and the album was a serious hit. It was arguably the best album to come out of Sacramento. The next album was Young Joker “Who’s Laughin At Cha (1994)”, and next was First Degree The D.E.’s “Southbound (1995)”. The combination of live keys, live bass, and a hard-core edge made Death Trap unique, but still Sacramento. A Latin rap pioneer named M Sane was also hitting the scene. It was the best of times.

It is important to mention that there were other labels and artists putting in work in Sacramento at this time. Marv Mitch and Lemay and Out Tha Drout Recordz were putting’ it down. Big Rock and T Nutty were getting themselves situated for their campaign, and from the north side of Sacramento, Hollow Tip, Dangerous Dame and High Side Records were also gaining attention. Gangsta Dre and Big Hollis were making Sacramento rap history as well. There are other house hold rap names that got their start in Sacramento as well.

 

Sacramento Rap History, Part Ten

 

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Mac Dre, once released from prison, started Thizz Entertainment in Sacramento

Although Mac Dre is from Vallejo, once he got out of prison for bank robbery, he started Thizz Entertainment in Sacramento. “Mac Dre is not from Sacramento, but he was based here in Sacramento. Got got started about the same time we got started. He was in Vallejo when all that stuff happens, but when he was Thizz Entertainment, all that stuff was Sacramento based.” Ced informs. As mentioned, Master P had Sacramento roots as well.

“I remember seeing Mac Dre at my local liquor store, and him tellin’ me I was in his movie (Treal TV)!” First Degree proudly reflects.

Big Lurch, was another Black Market artists that sold a lot of units. He is serving a life sentence for murdering 21-year-old female roommate Tynisha Ysais and eating parts of her body while under the influence of PCP in April 2002. Many Black Market artists have crazy stories.  Amazingly, Brotha Lynch Hung would end up being one of Black Market’s most normal stories. Which leads us to Mr. Doctor from the Garden Blocc.

Mr. Doctor was a half Black, half White, young OG from South Sacramento’s Crip lead Garden Blocc. “When we were making the album, Mr. Doctor got shot,” Ed Sing recalls. “We were in the middle of finishing that album up, he ended up surviving, and we went on to finish the album, and that album was an incredible album.” Ced reflects on Mr. Doc. on The Fahrenheit Hour. First Degree The D.E. proclaims that Mr. Doctor’s first solo, released in 1995, was his favorite Black Market album. He asks Ced to give more details.

 

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 Garden Blocc’s Mr. Doctor was all about that gangsta life

“What happened with Mr. Doctor, after ‘Setrippin Bloccstyle’ came out, Mr. Doctor was one of those cats that was in these streets bout it bout it, there was no playin’, no fakin’ with that cat.” Ced reflects. “Someone shot his house up. Some guys came out from his neighborhood and shot those guys up, and somebody ended up getting killed. Everybody went to jail, Mr. Doctor was the last one to get arrested,” Ced offers. “People sayin’ that he was a snitch and all that, I don’t know the true about that.” Mr. Doctor ended up  spending two years in jail while Black Market Records took care of his family. Once out, Mr. Doctor continued to release albums, “but had lost that edge because he matured in jail,” Cedric Singleton rationalized. Also Brotha Lynch had stopped making his beats. “I think he was scared,” offers Ced Sing.

By this time, deals were being made for hundreds of thousands of dollars. To hear actual amounts, listen to The Fahrenheit Hour #26, coming in August on YouTube.

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Ms Marvaless’ first solo “Ghetto Blues”, released by AWOL Records, established her as the Queen of Sacramento rap

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Brotha Lynch Hung’s “Loaded” turned the rap game upside down

Sacramento Rap History, Part Eleven

In 1996, the Sacramento sound was played and admired in every ‘hood in America, from L.A. to New York. It was time for a new Brotha Lynch album. Things were on the up, and Brotha Lynch and Black Market signed a lucrative contract for five years. Want to know for how much? Tune into Fahrenheit Hour’s Ced Sing appearances.

By this time, Brotha Lynch had reconnected with producer genius, Phonk Beta. In turn, Phonk Beta brought his long time Death Trap running mate, First Degree The D.E. into the picture. The scene was set for excellence, and excellence happened. With a professional, dark, cutting edge, lyrical, live keyboard, rubber bass sound, Loaded was enjoyed by underground rap lovers world-wide. Some were expecting the more street gang-banging style Lynch displayed in Season, but most were ready for the maturation of their favorite underground artist. Loaded was Sacramento’s rap momentum peak. Many argue it is the greatest piece of art the region has ever produced.

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C-Bo’s “The Autopsy” kept the AWOL hits coming

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First Degree The D.E.’s “Planet Zero” was Fahrenheit Records’ first official release

After Loaded, it was time for First Degree The D.E. to release an album, “Planet Zero”, which is his most popular to date. Once completed, with help from Phonk Beta and Brotha Lynch, First Degree The D.E. went to long time label partner, Dalvin Pipkins to put the album out. Once Dalvin met with City Hall Records’ Walter Zelnick, it was on, and Planet Zero hit the shelves. However, as soon as Planet Zero was released, Dalvin allegedly got high on drugs and rammed a cop car. Once released, he did it again a few weeks later! He was destined to be locked up a long time after that.

Davlin’s mishaps prompted the birth of Fahrenheit Records. First Degree visited the Sacramento jail of several occasions dealing with contract issues, but eventually got full rights to Planet Zero and has gone on to release over 40 more albums, including D.E.’s next album “Damn That D.E.” and “FU1”. Mr. Pipkins remembers, “Walter said Planet Zero had the most buzz of anything he had at the time!” The Fahrenheit crew included First Degree The D.E., Soupbone, an OG rilla from Freeport rap circles, and M Sane, a terror smashing pimp from the streets of L.A. Like Black Market, Death Trap, and AWOL, Fahrenheit Records had its own, world-wide, cult-like following.

“Does Brotha Lynch real eat scabs” First Degree recalls The Click’s B-Legit once asking him. “And yes, he was serious.” At this time, stars and the streets alike were fascinated with Sacramento music. This was also the time Siccness.net, an underground community based around Sacramento rap started by Roloc, was born.

With all of the success, wonderful music, money, fame, and unity in the Sacramento rap game, what could possibly go wrong? Find out! The History Of Sacramento Rap Part Three, The FALL coming soon to Fahrenheit Insight!

Lynch & DE Cover Upload-2First Degree The D.E. “Fahrenheit Collectibles, Brotha Lynch Hung & First D.E.” Out Now Digitally, In Record Stores 11.18.14

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DC RAY P FOLKS

The History Of Sacramento Rap (Part One, The Beginning)

DC RAY P FOLKS fahrenheit insight

The History Of Sacramento Rap

Written By First Degree The D.E. & Jimmy Blog For Fahrenheit Insight

Note: Sacramento rap history. After talking with Sacramento’s real rap pioneers, First Degree The D.E. and Fahrenheit columnist Jimmy Blog document the truth about the history of the Sacramento rap game for Fahrenheit Insight in this three part series. For the people!

 

Sacramento Rap History, Part One

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Break dancing was the first Sacramento urban hip hop expression

 

First there was dance, then there was rap.

In the late 70’s, early 80’s, when hip hop as being created at block parties in Brooklyn, New York, Sacramento had break dancers. This was a time that created funky-fresh clothing, break dancing, electric keyboards, boom boxes, heavy drum tracks, and other roots of the hip hop culture. This era gave eventually gave birth to the “Breakin’” movie series, “Krush Groove”, and many more. To be the king of Sacramento in those days, you had to not only know how to pop, but survive and control a dance battle. The main DJ in town was DJ Darryl Dennis, pumping up local events. DJ Darryl was the local star, that was until The Triple Threat Three, which was DC Ray, Mike C and Captain K hit the scene. They were rappin’.

 

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DJ Darryl Dennis & Captain K’s dance single “Sweat”. Check it out here

 

For the record, DC Ray was the first Sacramento rapper, and The Triple Threat Three was the first Sacramento rap group.

Around 1980ish, East Coast pioneers like The Sugar Hill Gang, Grandmaster Flash, Afrika Bambaataa, and Run DMC were creating a genre, defining a culture. Their messages were about fun, respect, and what was going on in the hood. DC Ray and The Triple Threat Three started around this time. As there was high school dance battles, South Sacramento became known for intense rap battles as well. “Burbank was the main battle spot, then MCs from everywhere started comin down,” reflects DC Ray on Fahrenheit Radio’s Fahrenheit Hour Urban Talk Show. Eventually, Sacramento’s unique hip hop style was on display in alleys, house parties, DJ parties, high schools, and dance clubs in the form of freestyle rap. It was pure, urban expression. It was the stuff that created what Sacramento is now known for; hard edged, in your face reality. When the dust settled, DC Ray and the Triple Threat Three became our Sactown representatives. They were 16.

 

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Fahrenheit graphic artist E-Moe getting down with DC Ray in Sacramento

 

During DC Ray’s recent appearance on Fahrenheit Radio’s “Fahrenheit Hour”, First Degree The D.E. mentioned the Rakim show and story they were writing for Fahrenheit Insight. “I was before Rakim!” includes DC Ray. Wow. “Back then, you had to sell your music out the trunk like Too Short,” remembers DC Ray.

 

Sacramento Rap History, Part Two

Once DC Ray became the King Of Urban Sac, the buzz exploded past our Sacramento borders and reached the Bay area and eventually, Los Angeles and New York. It was at this time that Russell Simmons’ Def Jam Records and new rap group Run DMC were blowing up on the East Coast. Run DMC decided to take their block party on the road. That road lead to Sacramento, and in 1983, The Triple Threat Three, Whodini, and Run DMC did a show at The 2nd Level in Sacramento. It was Sacramento’s first big rap show. A 13-year-old Kevin Mann (Brotha Lynch Hung) was front row, and all the local up-and-coming MCs were in the building. The Triple Threat Three turned the party out, getting the attention of Russell Simmons. After the show, Russell Simmons told The Triple Threat Three crew about their new label, Def Jam Records. Russell Simmons offered them a contract with one catch, they had to move to New York. Two of the Triple Threat Three were in, one was out, citing the mystery of Def Jam Records. At the time, Def Jam was still an up-coming label from a coast far away. Since the members of the Triple Threat Three were a group, they stuck together and declined Def Jam’s offer. On the Fahrenheit Hour, First Degree and DC Ray reflect on how the Sacramento rap game could have been much more had they gone to New York.

 

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Russell Simmons brought his Def Jam crew to Sacramento in 1983 in rap’s beginnings, also offering Sactown’s Triple Threat Three a contract

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Run DMC, Whodini, and The Triple Threat Three set the Sactown rap scene ablaze with Sacramento’s first big rap show.

 

In time, DC Ray and The Triple Threat Three’s battle-proven style, grit, and lyrical emphasis had made its way to Cletus Anderson and Saturn Records in Los Angeles. Saturn Records signed The Triple Threat Three and released “Scratch Motion”. Scratch Motion was Sacramento’s first official single in stores! It was 1984. An up-and-coming DJ named Dr. Dre was on the scratch! Yes, THE Dr. Dre scratches on Sacramento’s first rap record, Scratch Motion. There were records, and they were in stores. Sacramento had a hero, much earlier in the rap game than many are aware of.

 

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Sacramento’s first rap song, Triple Threat Three’s “Scratch Motion” You can hear it on Youtube here

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 Dr. Dre of the World Class Wreckin Crew scratched on Sacramento’s first single, “Scratch Motion”

 

On the Fahrenheit Hour episode with DC Ray, First Degree offers, “If you ever get Brotha Lynch real drunk, he’ll tell you the story about how the Triple Threat Three/Run DMC show got him in the rap game for real! Haha. He was in the front row, yada yada yada, he fell in love with the rap game”

“I remember when he was Kevin Ice Cold, what he was going by at the time. C-Bo was just comin up, he’s always been reppin’ that name.” DC Ray recognizes. “I like Brotha Lynch cuz he always gives props bout where it all came from. Its good that there are people like yourself, D.E., to document our history.”

 

Sacramento Rap History, Part Three

After rocking Scratch Motion for a couple years in clubs in town and on the road, the Triple Threat Three crew needed another single. They hit the studio and created a tribute to Marvin Gaye called “We Love You Martin”. It was 1985, and The Triple Threat Three was traveling the coast, turning out shows. Other Sacramento MCs, like Oak Park’s Homicide, The Godfather, Bad Mouth C, and Young Dre D were making names for themselves as well. By this time, the hip hop culture had taken over the city. The hero of the city was on records in stores. DC Ray also had a TV show on Public Access, interviewing stars.

While DC Ray was expanding expectations with his TV show, the next generation of rappers was chiseling their rap skills at the local high schools and street corners. This time, the young generation was mainly battling at Kennedy High in South Sacramento, aka The K-House. As with the generation before it, this next breed of rap battlers would engage after school and the best from other schools would come to test their skills in the arena. Familiar names like Brotha Lynch Hung, C-Bo, Triple Sicx, Luni, Marvaless, First Degree The D.E., Be Gee, AK47, and many more were free-styling their way into Sacramento notoriety.

 

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Sacramento’s Luni Coleone pays respect to DC Ray at a local event

The main hoods contributing to the new underground rap movement was Meadowview, The Garden Blocc (Florin Road), Greenhaven, Oak Park, Del Paso Heights, and Freeport. The Freeport area became a serious rap proving ground. Sac pioneer Ace Mak (Ace Of Spades at the time) was a producer and influenced many of the household names you know of today. “Ace Mak taught me to make beats,” First Degree exclaims. Freeport groups like Black Rage (Ace, AK, and Marvaless) and The Wicked lead the new generation rap underground. The town had something special on the bubble, their own sound, their own buzz, their own chip.

 

Sacramento Rap History, Part Four

In the late 80’s, DC Ray was introduced to Cedric Singleton, a young strategist from Ohio, equally hungry for the game. “Ced Sing” was starting a new label with Robert Foster called Black Market Records. DC Ray and Black Market Records came together and released Black Market’s first single, DC Ray’s “What’s The Matter With Your Life?”. At this time, DC Ray was still the only Sac rapper in stores. Black Market and DC Ray’s relationship eventually got complicated and the two moved on. To this day, there are a few things DC Ray would like to hear Ced Sing say.

 

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Black Market’s first single was DC Ray’s “What’s The Matter With Your Life?”

During the recording of The Fahrenheit Hour, DC Ray states that he would like Ced to clean up the mess he made, admit some of his wrongs, and move forward. “I can see he is trying to make everything right now,” DC Ray defends. “But I could have signed with Atlantic Records!” He then goes on stating that Atlantic Records was interested in him. Atlantic was told DC Ray wasn’t interested. DC Ray suspects someone at Black Market told Atlantic that he wasn’t interested. “We could have done a better job with ‘What’s The Matter With Your Life’,” DC Ray also realizes out loud.

 

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By the early 1990’s, Black Market Records was preparing a take over, They released Homicide and was building their brand. It was then that a young Dalvin Pipkins (eventual owner of Death Trap Records) walked newbies X-Raided and Brotha Lynch Hung into the Black Market office. Also during this time, Bobby T and C-Bo, affiliates with Vallejo underground up-comers E-40 and The Click, were getting their situation together and had big plans of their own. Dalvin, Be Gee, First Degree The D.E., Young Joker, and Phonk Beta were on the verge of making history as well. Colossal things were on the horizon for these rap pioneers and the city of Sacramento.

The actions of these young trailblazers later started the Sacramento rap era you think you know. Do you really know? Find out on part two of “The History Of Sactown Rap”, here on Fahrenheit Insight!

You can hear this interview with DC Ray in its entirety soon on Fahrenheit Radio and Youtube.

 

First Degree The D.E.

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“Fahrenheit Collectibles, Brotha Lynch Hung and First D.E.”
Out Now Digitally, In Stores November 18, 2014!

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Rare Interview With Phonk Beta of Fahrenheit & Madesicc

                  

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Rare Interview With Phonk Beta

Interview by Jimmy Blog For Fahrenheit Insight

     Every once in a long while, an album comes out that defines a time, defines a city. Here in Sacramento, California,  that album was Brotha Lynch Hung’s “Loaded” album, an album so rich with time, talent, and soul, it will never be duplicated. This album, and many more, was produced by the legendary Phonk Beta. Phonk Beta recently connected with First Degree The D.E. on the Fahrenheit Hour Urban Talk Show to talk Loaded, Fahrenheit, Symplex, Brotha Lynch, Death Trap, his beginnings, purpose in music and much more.

“I can’t remember when I first touched the pianos, 3 or 4 maybe, and I’ve been lovin’ um ever since!” Beta clarifies. Phonk Beta was born in San Francisco. He has also lived in Sacramento and New York. He has produced on over 75 albums, put out 2 solos, and is known world-wide for his jazzy, dark soulful sound. He is the creator of the “Sacramento Siccness” sound.

The conversation with First Degree and Phonk Beta started with Beta’s jazz roots. First Degree inquires where Beta got his talents from and Beta explains that by emulating jazz greats like Miles Davis and Count Basie, he was able to create and perfect the sound known as Phonk Beta. “My first love is jazz, a lot of people don’t know that.” Beta also goes on to explain, “I used to always know how to touch the ivories, and Brotha Lynch taught me how to program drum beats.” Phonk Beta and Brotha Lynch became friends in high school in South Sacramento. They then teamed up to create one of the greatest rap albums of all time.

“I didn’t even know what we was doin back then,” Beta explains while talking about the creation of Loaded. His and First Degree detail how back then, beat making was a community event. First Degree then talks Planet Zero and tells that Brotha Lynch, Beta, and himself made the beat to Blackula together. First Degree also goes on to remind the people that Beta was the producer of the early Death Trap albums. Death Trap was Phonk Beta, First Degree, Be Gee, and Dalvin Pipkins.

D.E. and Beta’s long musical history is all on wax. “Phonk Beta has produced on every First Degree album from Southbound all the way to FU4!” First Degree The D.E. boasts.

While in conversation, First Degree The D.E. reveals to Beta, “the rap game is too easy for you know, no one’s doing anything that’s beyond anything you can do.”

“I kinda lost love for the music cuz of the Black Market,” Beta explains, “I’m getting the love back, I’m a lot better than I was back then.” The D.E. later includes that if the Brotha Lynch and Ced Sing (Black Market) relationship worked, Sacramento would have been a top 3 rap hub. Beta then goes on to gush about the Symplex series. Symplex, The Complex And Simple World Of Phonk Beta Jazz, is Phonk Beta’s jazz collection he puts out on Fahrenheit Records. The first Symplex album was received well by the rap audience, and was some fans first exposure to jazz music. The second edition comes out November 18, 2014. The third, which is already done, comes out 2015. The Symplex series promises to change the game!

“You’re the only one that can bring jazz to the rap world!” First Degree tells Beta. “The best thing about Symplex, is that you get credit for your genius.” D.E. paraphrases.

Besides the Symplex series, Phonk Beta is working on a compilation called “The Containment Unit” with Madesicc Musicc. Beta reports that this comp will be produced by him and have a bunch of upcoming Sacramento talent. Beta also explains that the Reloaded album is full speed ahead. At this point, le Phonkster is the only human on Earth that can make that happen.

When asked about his legacy, Beta states, “I want to leave something for my future family, I’m teaching my son how to makes beats.” For the love of the rap game, let’s hope he learns!

On a personal note, Phonk Beta has been torn between the Brotha Lynch  and First Degree beef. Over the past year, Brotha Lynch and First Degree have had a very public altercation that thousands of fans have chimed in on. “Let’s get the record straight,” explains First Degree The D.E., “I’ve been working with Phonk Beta before anyone ever heard of a Brotha Lynch!” Although Beta had nothing to do with the beef with Lynch and D.E., his name has been flying around it’s discussions. Within the storm, Phonk Beta has been a calming, neutral force that all parties respect. Because of his affiliation with Lynch and D.E., he has taken beef from friends and fans, but to Beta’s credit, he stays even keel and will eventually be the glue that ties everything back together.

You can hear this interview in its entirety on Fahrenheit Hour on Fahrenheit Radio. You can check it out on demand on Youtube by searching “Fahrenheit Hour 23”. Symplex 2 comes out November 18, 2014. Phonk Beta beats for sale can be heard at http://www.reverbnation.com/phonkbeta. Phonk Beta also has a hot T shirt line he has started. Get up on Shlangz!

 

Phonk Beta “Symplex 2” Nov 18, 14

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Symplex 1 out now!